Violence and Repression Escalate Following Bolivian Coup [Graphic Videos, Photos 18+]

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Following the coup in Bolivia, repression against those who are attempting to protest in support of former-President Evo Morales is on the rise, with increasing violence.

It should be further noted that the coup against Evo Morales came less than a week after he cancelled an agreement with a German company for developing lithium for batteries like those in electric cars.

The Morales move on November 4th to cancel the December 2018 agreement with Germany’s ACI Systems Alemania (ACISA) came after weeks of protests from residents of the Potosí area. The region has 50% to 70% of the world’s lithium reserves in the Salar de Uyuni salt flats.

A report by Bloomberg News in 2018, said lithium demand is on the rise and it shows no promise of stopping, thus Bolivia would play a vital role in the events in the following years.

“Demand for lithium is expected to more than double by 2025. The soft, light mineral is mined mainly in Australia, Chile, and Argentina. Bolivia has plenty—9 million tons that have never been mined commercially, the second-largest amount in the world—but until now there’s been no practical way to mine and sell it.”

Stratfor claimed that the coup may make the country more politically unstable, which is undoubtedly true, but it is also possible that the self-proclaimed interim president Jeanine Anez might reverse Morales’ decision to cancel the agreement with ACISA.

“In the longer term, continued political uncertainty will make it more difficult for Bolivia to increase its production of strategic metals like lithium or develop a value-added sector in the battery market. The poor investment climate comes at a time of expanding global opportunities in lithium-ion battery production to meet rising demand from electric vehicle manufacturing.”

Violence is increasing throughout the country, following Morales’ resignation and the seizure of power by the right-wing opposition.

Clashes are happening in many cities across the countries, and there are numerous videos and photographs showing that the military and police are on the side of the right-wing opposition that carried out the coup against the elected President and his government.

The residents of the municipality of Yapacani, in the Santa Cruz district, denounced the onslaught of the military who took to the streets after President Evo Morales announced his resignation.

“We demand the immediate resignation of Senator Añez [Jeanine Anez who proclaimed herself interim President] for instigating violence. The criminal responsibility of Camacho and Mesa for the death of our Bolivian brothers. The resignation of all institutions for the defacing of the sacred emblem that is the wiphala.”

There are videos of military personnel moving in to clash with civilians:

Bolivian media reported that “the current fascist and racist regime continues with violent persecution and hunting in Bolivia especially in El Alto and Cochabamba.”

On the evening of November 12th, military helicopters shot at the indigenous people in La Paz. The original communities of El Alto report 6 dead and around 30 injured.

Following are all photographs and videos, provided by the South American media, some of them are quite graphic, thus discretion is advised.

Violence and Repression Escalate Following Bolivian Coup [Graphic Videos, Photos 18+]

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Violence and Repression Escalate Following Bolivian Coup [Graphic Videos, Photos 18+]

Click to see full-size image

Violence and Repression Escalate Following Bolivian Coup [Graphic Videos, Photos 18+]

Click to see full-size image

Violence and Repression Escalate Following Bolivian Coup [Graphic Videos, Photos 18+]

Click to see full-size image

Violence and Repression Escalate Following Bolivian Coup [Graphic Videos, Photos 18+]

Click to see full-size image

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