US Moves Its Tactical Nuclear Weapons from Turkey

Donate

The US has started to move nuclear weapons, stationed in Turkey, to Romania, in connection with deteriorating relations between Washington and Ankara.

US Moves Its Tactical Nuclear Weapons from Turkey

The Deveselu military base (Photo: AFP 2016 / Daniel Mihailescu)

Against the background of deteriorating relations between Washington and Ankara, the US has started to transfer nuclear weapons, stored in Turkey, to Romania, the EurActiv information website reported on Thursday, citing independent sources.

According to one of the sources, the operation is very complicated technically and politically.

As a recent Simons Center’s report revealed, about 50 units of US tactical nuclear weapons have been placed at the Incirlik air base in Turkey, about 100 km from the Syrian border, since the Cold War.

After the July’s coup attempt in the country, the Turkish government prohibited the flights of US aircraft to the base and out of it and then arrested a base commander for his involvement in the coup attempt. The report asked, whether the US would be able to maintain control of these weapons in the case of a prolonged civil conflict in Turkey, and did not give the answer on this question.

Another source said that the US-Turkey relations have deteriorated so much after the coup attempt that Washington no longer trusts Ankara to keep nuclear weapons. According to the source, the weapons are transferring to the Deveselu Romanian military base.

EurActiv noted that the Deveselu base is a placement of a new US missile shield, which causes great discontent of Russia.

The information appeared along with messages about the possible use of the Incirlik air base by the Russian Aerospace Forces for carrying out air strikes in Syria.

Meanwhile, just a day before, the civilian head of the US Air Force said that Washington does not see a need to move the nuclear weapons placed at the Turkey’s air base.

“We do have nuclear weapons and those nuclear weapons are safe and secure, and we are very confident in that,” Deborah Lee James, US Air Force Secretary, said on Wednesday, answering questions at the Foreign Press Club in New York City.

Last Wednesday, Lee James also tried to reassure reporters that tensions between Washington and Ankara will not affect the nuclear bombs.

“They obviously are our ally. We stand with them, they’re an effective air force, and Incirlik is an important location for our joint fight,” she said at the State of the Air Force briefing last week.

However, as we can see, her statements were likely not so plausible.

Donate

SouthFront

Do you like this content? Consider helping us!

  • Alex

    This is called Nuclear proliferation by Washington. The Nuclear proliferation law is there but who act on that. Its ridiculous, Washington dumping there nuclear weapons around the world. There is no Nuclear proliferation law or sanction for Washington. Its absolutely crime against humanity. LOL

  • Alex

    Washington looking for government oppositions parties in the target countries and then give them training and full political support to make them potential terrorists. Then their machineries by gun point take innocent civilians from their homes to fight for them against governments. Washington playing this game around the world but there is no sanction against them.

    These terrorists are not so clever they are all short sighted just use there boss Washington intelligence instructions.
    LOL.

  • chris chuba

    So they move them closer to Moscow, what a surprise.

    • John

      Yes. That seems a bit wierd. Makes it much easier to take them out. I am not going whole hog on this bit of news just yet.

  • Pave Way IV

    Nukes in NATO’s insane nuclear sharing scheme at Incirlik, as well as the ones in Italy, Netherlands, Germany and Belgium, violate the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. The treasonous U.S. weasels that came up with this scheme claim that it doesn’t violate the treaty because the B-61s can’t be used until unlocked/armed with the U.S.-held codes. They claim nuclear sharing will only violate the treaty when they are unlocked, so the U.S. and NATO are not currently violating it.

    I hate to agree with the psychopathic leaders of my country, but I have to say it’s a good idea. So good, that I think Russia should do the exact same thing: pre-position locked nuclear weapons in friendly states ‘just in case’. I say fly about a dozen or two RS-26 Rubezh (SS-X-31) to Hamadan, Iran. Just hack together some kind of electronic lock that needs codes from Moscow to arm the warheads. See? No NPT violation yet because they’re not armed! The U.S. shouldn’t have any objections because they do the same thing, right? And how can Israel possibly complain? This nuclear sharing agreement removes the incentive from Iran to build their own weapons. That’s the precise logic the U.S. used when it came up with it. Non-proliferation is good, right?

    So, Russia – do the right thing. Discourage nuclear proliferation (just like the Americans) by pre-positioning some locked nukes in Iran. The U.S. won’t object. In fact, we should be absolutely delighted – we thought it was a wonderful idea when we did it. Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.

    • Oz

      And Cuba, Nicaragua, Greece, Serbia, etc.
      It does not seem wise to assume that some of these countries could not replace the detonation caps on these bombs with their own. Would have same technology as the US, and how much hassle would it save. Dial a Nuke. Home delivery. I’m not anti American per se but the US politicians seem to think that international treaties are there to control the actions of other countries, but the US can ignore them. This could unfortunately have dire consequences for the US sooner or later.

  • Their should not be a single nuke outside of actual America land. None in Korea or Japan or in Europe.
    Their should not be a single America solder in Europe, and no America should have joined the First World War. Joining the First World War is what led to the Second World War.