US Adopts New Arms Exports Policy To Challenge Russia In Weapons Market

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US Adopts New Arms Exports Policy To Challenge Russia In Weapons Market

FILE IMAGE: AFP Photo / Bonny Schoonakker / AFP

On April 19, White House Director of the Office of Trade and Manufacturing Policy David Navarro stated that the new US arms exports policy would give allies better access to US weapons and reduce their reliance on Russian systems, the Russian news agency Sputnik reported.

Earlier US officials shared their plans to implement new export rules on the US weapon sales to reduce the time required to approve the deals. For example, now US firms face less limitations in their drone sales abroad. However, such moves still have to be authorized by the US government.

Navarro emphasized that this US measure would uphold new sanctions on Russia’s defense sector:

“Providing our allies and partners with greater access to American arms will also reduce their reliance not just on Chinese knockoffs but also on Russian systems, consistent with Countering American Adversaries Through Sanctions Act [CAATSA]”.

He told that the decision had been aimed at reverting Obama’s “myopic” limitations imposed on US allies willing to buy drones. Navarro added that this will allow to “increase their [US companies] direct sales to authorized allies and partners”.

The chief trade advisor noticed that US allies had been forced to but Chinese “knock-offs,” claiming that some of the Chinese drones had been copied from the US models.

Navarro shared confidence that many US allies wanted to “buy American”. He also added that opening up the drone market would support millions of jobs in the USA and would help to achieve the presidential goal to eliminate the trade deficit.

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  • RichardD

    Most Americans are adverse to these fabricated false flag military adventures. Which is why we put Trump in office to stop this criminal insanity. But he’s not delivering the goods like he said that he would. And is instead selling us out to the evil Jews and their collaborators who’re fabricating these unnecessary conflicts.

  • Hrky75

    US produces hi cost, technologically complicated, expensive to maintain and in quite a few cases highly unreliable weapon systems. In addition they systems are usually heavily downgraded even if sold to their NATO “partners”. Example – Croatia buying F-16I from Israel that will have to be stripped of loads of navigation and targeting eqp before being handed over, all per US request – the Israelis were quite Ok with selling the lot. That complicates use and regular servicing and limits potential user’s postion on spare parts markets. But the biggest problem, of all is that all the equipment comes with astronomical political price tag. Russia has a more liberal approach when it comes to arms sales and is ready to sell even to the countries that oppose it politically or diplomatically – but on a strict commercial basis. In case of Iran nuke deal any potential buyer of US weapons can see how much a political agreement and/or business deal with US is worth. And if they still find buying US offer appealing – well it’s their funeral, literally…

    • Rob

      For how long they will import US hardware for 5 years for 10 years. Now they want to produce itself, not to import from USA. Like Iran, Pakistan, China and North Korea. They have imposed ban on US weapons. It is much cheaper to produce these weapons.

      • Hrky75

        That’s the whole point. Spare parts and upgrades are where really big money is made. US rarely licences weapons and spares to be produced domestically and in most cases buyer countries are not technologically advanced enough to pull it off anyways. In addition having countries dependent on US spare parts make them more , shell we say,”reliable political partners” – i.e. geo strategic lap dogs

        • Rob

          Bying military hardware from Russia and China is more attractive because of quality, durability, maintenance and even transfer of technology, joint production, training etc.

          • Hrky75

            Ex Yugoslavia used to sell tons of military equipment – mostly basic stuff, rifles, MGs light and heavy artillery – to the Middle east Africa and Asia, along with civilian equipment not because it was technologically advanced, but because there weren’t any strings attached. Russia and China use the same logic and it works provided that you are A) to bloody big to be effectively invaded by your own weapons and B) not trying to be an exceptional uni-polar world hegemon that’s bound to invade one of your buyers sooner or later and end up getting killed by your own stuff…

    • FlorianGeyer

      Russian equipment has also demonstrated its serviceability in real war situations where there is not a ‘Main Dealer’ filled with expensive technician’s nearby :)

      Russian equipment has been reliable in national armies and also in terrorist groups where a well staffed logistics component is not readily available.

      In short, Russian equipment works and has less down time than the higher priced US offerings.

  • JEinCA

    By “challenging” they mean forcing their vassals to buy their overpriced sub par products.

  • John Brown

    This is another defeat for the empire as this is an admission that their weapons are inferior and can’t compete

  • Serious

    Don’t buy, build. Especially, don’t buy US military products.

  • goingbrokes

    There goes “free trade” again – Companies 99.9% dependent on state contracts try to sanction overseas manufacturers so that they have/maintain a monopoly. Yes, monopoly, how is monopoly “Free trade”? I know it’s a dumb question, but it has to be asked.