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Tactical Fashion Among Syrian Terrorists

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The original article was published by Daily War, and it is called Tactical (Russian) fashion among Syrian terrorists.

Looks are everything, efficiency is nothing.

As they say, the self-isolation regime is a great time to do something that your hands have not touched in the past.

I don’t know if there are different types of terrorists sitting in Syrian Idlib, but the fact that some of them will continue to follow the tactical fashion is 100% pure fact.

Tactical Fashion Among Syrian Terrorists

Probably natives from Chechnya in the ranks of Malhama Tactical. Click to see full-size image

First, we run into the eternal question – what did we forget in Syria?

At the time of the start of the Russian operation, quite a few Russian citizens and citizens from the CIS countries (primarily Central Asian countries) fought on the side of ISIS.

So much so that the Russian language was used in territories controlled by terrorists along with Arabic.

The inscriptions in Russian were used onroad signs, there were textbooks in Russian for the preparation of the “Lion of the Caliphate,” and so on.

And all these citizens expected sooner or later to return to their homeland, to build the caliphate wilayat (friendship) in their area of residence.

This is something they were not allowed to do.

Most of the militants with Russian passports were either eliminated or returned to the Russian Federation, but directly into the caring hands of law enforcement and justice.

However, the (conditionally) Russian legacy in Syria remained and spread among other terrorist groups.

First of all, this relates to the Gorka suit.

Whoever doesn’t know, the Gorka is the type of mountain windproof suit that became widespread during the USSR war in Afghanistan.

The suit is made of dense fabric that protects against wind and moisture, and has good resilience indicators.

And Gorka is a suit that is rather simple and cheap to manufacture, which is why in modern times it has become widespread even in civilian environments.

During the fighting in the North Caucasus, at first it was mainly used by law enforcement officers, and as the costume spread in civilian traffic, local militants began to use it more and more often.

Tactical Fashion Among Syrian Terrorists

Another Russian-speaking fighter in a self-made Gorka and a Kalashnikov in the bullpup pattern. Click to see full-size image

Syria, although a Middle Eastern country, and even one that has deserts, but in winter, especially in the mountains, temperatures tend to drop towards zero degrees Celsius.

Moreover, at this time of the year there is more rainfall. So with a moisture and windproof suit, it would be more comfortable.

The locals appreciated it, and therefore began not only to bring in the Gorka bought from various places, but also to produce it themselves.

This primarily concerns the terrorist seamstresses of Idlib.

Such suits can be easily identified by the strange arrangement of pockets, reinforced inserts, zippers and velcro as costume fasteners, camouflage inserts with exotic camouflage patterns.

Tactical Fashion Among Syrian Terrorists

The ISIS militant did not understand what he wanted more – a Gorka or a military shirt. So he bought something in between. Click to see full-size image

Yes, in Idlib you can’t meet such a number of “Russian” militants, but there are enough Russian speakers (primarily from Central Asian countries). And many use the same Russian “Gorka”.

But in general, the demand for tactical fashion is growing. An unconditional example of this is the media claims regarding the Malhama tactical “PMC.”

It is primarily media because there is no reliable and documented evidence of the full participation of this unit in hostilities. But reports on how they prepare other fighters, how they allegedly carry out secret and dangerous special tasks, are published regularly.

And the purpose of this is to raise more money for jihad. And it is no PMC.

Nevertheless, money is continuously sent to them, but where does it go?

And this is where the tactical fashion made its advent. A lot has been said about it before me, by people more competent than me, who have undeniable combat experience.

In short: looking like a cool fighter and being a cool fighter are two completely different realities.

It is like the difference liquid and gaseous state of water.

The idiots, having been spoiled by donations began buying uniform, unloading systems, belts and pouches. But this is minuscule, and one can always say that it is useful.

In skillful hands, the truth is that it comes in handy. However, they should have probably upgraded their weapons.

The main thing, my friends, they focus on isn’t a tactical upgrade, although it is also important and may be done, but the coloring of the Kalashnikovs with a bullpup pattern.

Tactical Fashion Among Syrian Terrorists

Click to see full-size image

The piece turned out to be so popular among the most tactical Mujahideen that it might seem that Ukrainians send their Malyuk rifles to Syria or the Chinese reworked their Type 86S. But this is not the case.

Tactical Fashion Among Syrian Terrorists

Click to see full-size image

In the future, the Kalashnikov bullpups are painted, beautiful forends and tactical arms are set up and an even stranger thing begins. Thermal cameras and nightlights are installed on these automatic rifles, and each of these cameras and nightlights is worth at least 100,000 rubles ($1,330). And they’re most likely produced in Belarus.

Tactical Fashion Among Syrian Terrorists

Click to see full-size image

These gizmos are magnificent, no can argue with that.

The only question is, why are these “bullpup weapons” in the hands of fighters who shoot only at firing ranges?

And what’s also important, as the recent militant offensive in Idlib, supported by the Turkish army, ultimately shows, in large offensive operations, much, almost the majority, as artillery, aviation and armored vehicles decide the fighting. Unlike what used to happen in the good old days: menacing-looking guys in Gorkas with camo patterns, and painted Kalashnikovs.

Tactical Fashion Among Syrian Terrorists

Click to see full-size image

However, one can only rejoice at having to fight such opponents.

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