Syrian Army Captures Armoured Vehicles Supplied By U.S. Military Operations Room In Jordan To Militants (Photos)

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On July 7, the Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA) released photos of several armored vehicles, which were captured by the Syrian Arab Army (SAA) inside the Nasib border crossing in the western Daraa countryside.

Among the vehicles, four OT-64 SKOT amphibious armored personnel carriers (APCs), which was made by Poland and former Czechoslovakia. Despite that the SAA operated a number of these vehicles previously, experts believe that the ones found in Nasib had been supplied by the U.S. Military Operations Room (MOC) in Jordan to the Free Syrian Army (FSA).

Syrian Army Captures Armoured Vehicles Supplied By U.S. Military Operations Room In Jordan To Militants (Photos)

Click to see full-size image, By SANA

Syrian Army Captures Armoured Vehicles Supplied By U.S. Military Operations Room In Jordan To Militants (Photos)

Click to see full-size image, By SANA

Syrian Army Captures Armoured Vehicles Supplied By U.S. Military Operations Room In Jordan To Militants (Photos)

Click to see full-size image, By SANA

Syrian Army Captures Armoured Vehicles Supplied By U.S. Military Operations Room In Jordan To Militants (Photos)

Click to see full-size image, By SANA

On May 22 of 2017, Turkish photographers Alper Böler and Yörük Işık released photos of Danish cargo ship “Hanne Danica” carrying OT-64 SKOT APCs while passing the Bosporus en route to the Suez Canal. The ship likely headed from there to the Jordanian port of Aqaba. Later the APCs appeared with the FSA in Daraa.

The SAA also captured at least three Soviet-made MT-LBs armored vehicles. This type was not seen in service with the SAA in southern Syria before, which suggests that it was also supplied to the FSA by the MOC.

Syrian Army Captures Armoured Vehicles Supplied By U.S. Military Operations Room In Jordan To Militants (Photos)

Click to see full-size image, By SANA

Syrian Army Captures Armoured Vehicles Supplied By U.S. Military Operations Room In Jordan To Militants (Photos)

Click to see full-size image, By SANA

Syrian Army Captures Armoured Vehicles Supplied By U.S. Military Operations Room In Jordan To Militants (Photos)

Click to see full-size image, By SANA

In the upcoming days, the FSA will hand over loads of weapons, which were supplies by the MOC, to the SAA under the evacuation agreement that was reached on July 6.

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  • Rob

    We know that Israel, ISIS, Al-Qaeda etc have created by child butchers US and Europe.

  • Ronald

    Free military equipment is always appreciated, even if it’s used and needs new tracks.

  • Wise Gandalf

    Syria can sell them to Turkey. So destroy the yankee embargo. :))

  • Smaug

    Wha?
    I googled this vehicle and it’s an old Warsaw Pack vehicle, the US is allied to few of its operators. It is not surprising if the US managed to give some weapons to the FSA and it would not be surprising that these weapons would be captured by the SAA. But why would we go through all the trouble of getting these heavy armored vehicles only to huve them to militias that wouldn’t be able to use them.

    However, Syria is an operator and it would be reasonable to think that these APCs were captured in the early stages like the T-55 captured earlier.

    Dear South Front: Quit relying on single sources for articles, you cannot assume every detail is true.

    • Terra Cotta Woolpuller

      Syria has none of this equipment this came in thru Denmark shipping much of this equipment is old Soviet Bloc Era companies no surprise as US replaced the old equipment but surprisingly lot of T-55 tanks they never had.

  • georgeking

    I expect the Syrian Arab Army, now has more Western Arms and Ammunition than many small NATO countries

    • Terra Cotta Woolpuller

      Problem is way too much and storing it in this heat and improper storage of it has led to explosions to occur and every Tom, Dick and Harry making claims of airstrikes and bombing these depots.

  • RichardD

    I’ve looked at buying the OT-64. It’s a dated vehicle. But still very capable with NBC protection and room for up to 20 people. It’s compatible with the .50 cal and 20mm security equipment that I’ve purchased for remote desert test site disc craft R&D. They made quite a few of them and their very affordable if you’re knowledgeable with running heavy equipment as I am.

    • RichardD
      • RichardD

        Campguard perimeter security motion detection light and siren lanterns:
        https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2a8a1441a75c2d4831e2c4fbcf2d7f3f6efc5a5b61d14109e624a2f2f29153b4.jpg

        • RichardD

          Once I got to the mountaintop parking area last night. I hiked a couple of more miles past that on a trail deeper into the wilderness. I didn’t see any non conventional tracks or creatures, or hear any. Before I headed back to the truck. I laid down for 30 minutes to rest up. When I got up and turned on my head lamp to get going.

          It sounded like a bear had wandered nearby that I startled, and it started huffing and puffing. I didn’t go looking for it. And with the CZ-52 in my jacket pocket and a .32 in my pants pocket, I wasn’t overly concerned. With 30 plus inches of large dangerous game penetration capability from 85 grain bullets traveling at 1,700 fps. The CZ-52 should stop bear, bigfoot or most offplanet hostiles at close range with well placed shots. And it’s easier to carry than the Sub 2000 in .40 S&W.

          • RichardD
          • RichardD

            With a wide angle headlamp, I can maintain situational awareness and fire with both pistols at night if that becomes necessary.
            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/36cbcc7ae7d30e731d3dd0c6a9e3d02646f6b4ed6117164ddcc9eb6f3cb36afa.jpg

          • Trut Tella

            Bro, the Bronco is fucking sweeeet, but you might consider getting something larger if bears are about. You shoot 8 rounds of 7.62 Tokarev hardball into a bear it will likely die bleeding out, but you might already be digested by that point.

            The Sub 2000’d probably do the job, or any dear rifle you might have, but a pistol in a gruntier cartridge- at least something like a Taurus Tracker- might not be the worst idea.

          • RichardD

            I looked at those options when choosing a woods gun. A 15 shot 10mm would be a good choice if all that you were concerned about is bear. My Sub 2000 in .40 S&W with the 16 inch barrel has comparable ballistics. With far greater mid range accuracy and ammunition capacity.

            I went with the CZ-52 for it’s penetration and longer range accuracy. It’s a tack driver with a lot less recoil than a 10mm. Economics was also an issue. I got it at a surplus price in pristine condition for half the price of a 10mm. The Tok cartridge will go through a lot that even a 10mm won’t. Some of them are pushing 2,000 fps with a hot load that you can run in a CZ-52 with the heavier spring upgrade. That’s a lot out of a handgun.

            There are no brown bear where I’m running ops at this time. The Tok is more than enough for black bear. A magazine dump at close range is much worse than 12 guage 00 buckshot. Which has one shot stopping power at close range.

          • Trut Tella

            Yeah, the CZ-52 is a great little gun.

            The V6 is a great motor too. There’s been a few swaps of that Cologne V6 into the early sub 1 ton 4 stroke Saabs which had a variant of the same motor as a V4 originally (replacing a two smoker in the earliest ones). Absolutely insane.

          • RichardD

            I didn’t realize that they made cars that light back then. I looked up the VW bug too, and that’s only 1,600 pounds. The Saab 96 is a good looking small coup. The 2.9 liter fuel injected V6 must push it along at a pretty good clip. Even in the 3,400 pound Bronco ll does 0 to 60 mph in 10 seconds. Which was respectable acceleration for a lot of sports cars when the Saab 96 came out in 1960.

          • RichardD

            Sub 2000 and 9mm with up to 18 inch penetration Double Tap 147 grain +p woods rounds:

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/1ca821a1a4c8edd189ffdfb8092965f65d7b4575c9dac1d108935c1b29b5c184.jpg

          • RichardD
    • PZIVJ

      Do you have room for OT-64 in your driveway?
      I am curious about Campguard, what is the detection range and is it adjustable?

      • RichardD

        The Apcs would be garaged if I get to that stage. The technology for disc craft is available. But money and security are issues.

        The Campguard lanterns have a 360 degree 35 foot radius motion detection and emit a room fire alarm, load prolonged beep siren, inter spaced with a verbal recording that says:

        “Warning Motion Activated”

        I’m planning to run them in a triangle pattern. Two in front of the tent door on each side and one behind it at 50 feet distance from each other. Which will provide a 40 yard diameter circumference perimeter with good overlap. So two may go off if the perimeter is breached. They’re programmed to go off if anything larger than a raccoon enters the restricted area.

        There is a 15 second delay from when they’re armed to get out of the detection zone before they activate.

        A 36 inch probe of the type that I encountered on an op in Indian Spings, NV south of Area 51 floating about chest high 75 to 100 feet from me. Would probably set them off. Depending on it’s level of materialization.

        • PZIVJ

          A 35 foot radius is good.
          I would recommend 4 of them, with a cardboard light blocker behind them.
          So your night vision would not be messed up.

          • RichardD

            I don’t have an opinion on the aluminum. Vertical detection is a concern. Because if something is levitating above the campsite, the motion detectors might not pick it up. So blocking the inboard motion detection might not be a good idea. Because if something comes down inside the perimeter, at a certain point they’l pick it up.

            Night vision is an issue. But if something is so close that it’s setting off the perimeter security system, the tactical lights on my 9mm, .40 S&W and other weapons would be my go to option. Thermal or night vision detection and target acquisition are more of an issue at longer ranges and when you’re trying to avoid detection. Like last summer when I had what sounded like 2 or more bigfoot just outside my headlamp range. One at 12:00 between my position and the basin entrance way, and one at 2:00 or 3:00 that I was concerned may be flanking me to cut off my exit back to the truck.

            There thermal or night vision would have been helpful to see what I was dealing with without the escalation of going to heavier lighting which may have led to an attack. Once I turned my back on them and headed back over the plateau edge and down the 700 foot head wall. They could no longer locate my position easily. My special forces training on evasion and escape is that you want to disappear if necessary. Which is basically what I did.

  • as

    No healthcare for the folks but they do of course can afford some unknown militants somewhere with armored vehicle for free.