Syrian Army Advances East Of Khanasir

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Syrian Army Advances East Of Khanasir

The Syrian Arab Army (SAA) has taken control of the villages of Al-Shreima, Jadidah and Rasm Askar as well as several strategic hills east of Khansir from ISIS in the eastern Aleppo countryside. SAA engineer units have begun working on removing mines and IEDs left behind by ISIS fighters, according to pro-government sources.

It is believed that Syrian Army began the advance east of Khanasir in order to push ISIS fighters from the eastern Aleppo countryside to the Resafa-Ithriyah road, which is under fire control of the SAA, to exterminate them and liberate the entire eastern Aleppo countryside.

The ISIS-linked News Agency Amaq published photos of an ISIS attack on SAA positions in eastern Resafa in the southern Raqqa countryside. However, the SAA managed to repel the attack.

Syrian Army Advances East Of Khanasir Syrian Army Advances East Of Khanasir Syrian Army Advances East Of Khanasir Syrian Army Advances East Of Khanasir Syrian Army Advances East Of Khanasir Syrian Army Advances East Of Khanasir Syrian Army Advances East Of Khanasir

According to sources from the Desert Hawks Brigade, SAA and Desert Hawks Brigade reinforcements continue reaching the eastern Hama countryside and the operation will be launched once the SAA liberates the Resafa-Ithriyah road and the remaining areas in the eastern Aleppo countryside.

ISIS also claimed that its members have damaged a tank of the Syrian Army with an ATGM east of the Arak gas field in the eastern Homs countryside.

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  • Ma_Laoshi

    Wouldn’t it be better to do both ops simultaneously if they involve *different* units? Is it a logistics issue? Are the Hawks waiting for something or have they just now been trained/equipped. Facts on the ground people, Trump’s still up to something.

    • Wahid Algiers

      SAA and hawks are awaiting a complete formation of the reinforcements and for the sign to start when the road is fully taken from both sides. ISIL then will be cut off and encircled and has only one way to get out: through the road under fire or starving in a last paradies on earth without any supplies of food and water while the ring will snap and snap and snap.

    • Alex Black

      I think the goal is to get ISIS to panic and go on the move. Once they are on the move, the air-force is going to take them apart. SAA, could have closed the pockets, but then they will just dig in, and it will be like digging out ants, not impossible but tiresome, but get them moving, and that makes for a good youtube video.

  • joe doe

    I wish the SAA could advance more quaker, than the speed they have now. This is nothing more than crawling and make situation is Syria more difficult. In another hand, i think the SAA is advancing under the fair being potential target from Americans, as Russia failed to protect Syria and SAA.

    I notice SAA almost stop advances on most all front lines of fair being bomb, while SDF is continue advances and most like will continue advances in other direction after Raqqa is liberate and SAA also is attack by FSA that Americans support.

    I would advice Assad to watch his back.

    Russia has lost reputation and respect and will be very hard for Russia to restore reputation and respect.

    • John Whitehot

      lol, even if Russia lost half of its reputation and respect, it still has infinitely more than the US, the UK, Israel, west ukraine, and all the whores of uncle Soros.

      Besides, in the crooked, nightmarish world you’re living in, Russia “failed to protect Syria”, yet Syria has literally passed from being hopeless to being undefeated in the war against jihadism thanks to Russia intervention.

      If that’s how Russia fails to protect countries from terrorism, I guess it’s gonna be the first and only country that will be asked for help in the future, should the zio-jihadist plague pop up its dickhead elsewhere

      • Attrition47

        Yet again the obsession with speed; you’d think people would have got over Rommel’s flashy trivialities by now. This is a war of attrition and the Syrian Army can’t afford to throw men away and can’t risk a serious reverse. The lulls are as important as the advances.

        • Wahid Algiers

          More important now is strategy to get all ressources (west of Euphrate River) and to secure gear lines and flanks. The lost parts “en moment” are to deal in a next round (Idleb, Turkish occupied land, east of Euphrate, jordan border and some pockets). The main aim now must be Deir Ezzor west of Euphrate and DE city by purging the last Countrysides of Aleppo, Homs and Hama.

          • Ronald

            Don’t forget Dier Ezzor , east of the Euphrate’s all along the river , those are the oil wells with real value . That is why the US took out the bridges in the city , that way SAA had no access , and ISIS could go on stealing the high grade oil .

          • Wahid Algiers

            You are fully right. I only mentioned what is possible to aim by now (next two months).

          • Attrition47

            Yes, that’s what I’m on about.

        • John Whitehot

          imho this is not a war of attrition, WW1 is the example of a war of attrition.

          I agree on the Rommel trivialities, people should forget much of what they know about WW2 in the desert because things are very different today.

          • Attrition47

            That’s the point I was making but you are very much mistaken if you think that this isn’t a war of attrition.

          • John Whitehot

            depends on what you mean by war of attrition.
            technically most wars include some form of attrition.

            The word defines a situation in which losses are caused by the positioning of opposing forces in close vicinity.

            So it tends to be used to describe conflicts where a large percentage of losses occurs outside the operational level.

            In WW1 you had thousands of Kms of fronts with opposing trenches.
            Today it tends to be very different, areas of control change quicklier than daily, and opposing forces tend not to entrench theirselves inside the range of the enemy.

            In that sense, the conflict in Donbass fits much more the description, although in the end, every scenario is one and only, and these tends to be not very meaningful generalizations.

          • Attrition47

            You haven’t taken account of demographics, economics, propaganda and diplomacy. You might notice as well that the Desert War (1940-1943) was just as much a war of attrition as the Western Front 1914-1918. The Syrian army has to be careful not to use itself up fighting the US head-chopping, heart-eating rapers, it needs to be fairly intact after they’ve gone. Each geographical bound needs to be prepared carefully by intelligence, deception, air cover, artillery firepower and managing prisoners to recruit those willing to change sides. There can be no rapid, fast manoeuvres until this enemy is ground down to the point that the US head-chopper air force, radar, intelligence etc assistance is of no great use.

          • John Whitehot

            yawn, my impression is that you just put a block of text to keep up.
            Demographics? Propaganda? Diplomacy and Economy?

            The subject was attrition in conflicts and frankly I don’t see how the above apply. They are all things that apply to the more generic contest of wars

          • Attrition47

            You’re out of your depth.

          • John Whitehot

            yaw.. zzzzz.

        • Justin Ryan

          Shut the fuck up Attrition47! Stop referring To Rommel and Falaise!

          You do ur best to paste in some Nazi Shit every chance u have!

          U support the USA in this war so fuck off RAT!

          USA is Israel ya fuckin Jew Rat!

    • Wahid Algiers

      Why so pessimistic? Have you ever fought in a difficult terrain against nuts fighters? So imagine that the high command, the first relevant commander and the staff of the field commanders exactly know what they are doing in any situation. They are resting clam despite of the cowardly airstrikes of Uncle Sam (US) and his bad son (“Israel”) both of the USrael family.

    • John

      Hello Joe doe. I don’t understand how Russia failed to protect Syria? I read this a lot, especially here on SF now and from those who are relatively new posters. It doesn’t wash with what has gone done since Russia came into the game. So, what do you mean by failed to protect? Have a great evening.

  • Bernd Herzog Römhild