Situation In Syria’s Idlib Requires High-Level Talks: Kremlin

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Situation In Syria's Idlib Requires High-Level Talks: Kremlin

Ugur Can/DHA via AP

The Russian news agency TASS reports (source):

The situation in Syria’s Idlib province requires a serious high-level discussion, Russian Presidential Spokesman Dmitry Peskov said.

“The situation in Idlib is difficult, discussions will go on,” he said. “You know that several days ago, there were bilateral and trilateral discussions. Today, the conversation will continue because the situation is serious – let’s put it this way – there are some differences in approaches, so it requires serious high-level talks,” Peskov added.

At the same time, Kremlin spokesman said that there were no plans to arrange a new conversation between the Russian leader and the Iranian President Hassan Rouhani. However, in Peskov’s words, such a conversation cannot be ruled out because the situation on the ground requires intensive discussions. “So in case the need arises, everyone will hold telephone conversations,” he said.

Sochi talks

Russian President Vladimir Putin and his Turkish counterpart Recep Tayyip Erdogan are scheduled to hold a meeting in the Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi on Monday to discuss the Syrian crisis. The meeting’s agenda particularly includes pressing issues concerning bilateral cooperation in resolving the issue. The two leaders are expected to focus on ways to separate militants active in Idlib from moderate opposition members and civilians, as well as on the possibility of a ground operation in the region.

Erdogan’s position

The Turkish president said earlier that he expected a positive discussion of the situation in Idlib with Putin and called for finding a solution to the issue together with Russia and the US-led coalition. “We have already held talks with Germany and France. We have been dealing with the issue together with Russia,” Erdogan said, adding that “consultations between leaders are definitely necessary.”

When explaining Turkey’s view on the Idlib issue, Erdogan said that Ankara and Moscow could “take joint steps against terrorists mingled with moderate opposition members.” “But let us not try to justify air strikes in the region,” he said.

Tehran summit

On September 7, the Iranian capital of Tehran hosted the third summit between the leaders of Iran, Russian and Turkey, who discussed measures for resolving the Syria issue, paying particular attention to the Idlib situation. Hassan Rouhani, Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan said in the summit’s final declaration that the three countries were determined to continue cooperation until terrorism was completely eliminated and the situation in Syria stabilized. The Russian president stressed at the final press conference that driving militants out of Idlib was “a priority task at the moment.”

Situation in Idlib

Idlib is the only Syrian province still controlled by illegal armed groups. In 2017, a de-escalation zone was established in the region, where militants reluctant to lay down their arms can move together with their families. According to United Nations Special Envoy for Syria Staffan de Mistura, Idlib currently hosts about 10,000 militants from the Jabhat al-Nusra and Al-Qaeda terror groups (both outlawed in Russia).

In case Damascus succeeds in restoring control over Idlib, it will bring large-scale military activities in Syria to an end.

In the past two weeks, Turkey deployed additional troops, armored equipment, artillery and missile launcher systems to the border, particularly with Syria’s Idlib province, where Ankara established 12 observation points to monitor the situation in the de-escalation zone.

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  • Joe Doe

    Russia, talk is cheap and the ideology to transfer all terrorist to Idlib will back fire. Now, gone be very difficult to liberate Idlib. To many terrorist and Turkey and USA is involved. Without S-400 and more Pantsir and VERBA MANPAD and more modern Airplanes and helicopter Syria has very little change to survive or liberate Idlib and Russia will not step in to defend Syria. In 2016 was a chance to liberate Idlib, but for some reasons SAA stop the advances, and this was big blunder, now is to late

    • Concrete Mike

      Nah, i dont think its too late.

      2017 was to clean isis out of homs, these fuckers really had to go. Idlib was easily contained, but these isis pricks had to be stopped and liquidated.

      SAA took the best option available.

      Look at how much manpower was freed up cleaning out homs province.

      At the time it would have been nearly impossible to clobber idlib without opening up damascus to an isis attack from homs.

    • John Brown

      Syria will get the military help it needs. Turkey and Erdogan are desperate, this is an act of weakness not strength. Turkey can’t afford any serious military conflict or occupation now, it is on the verge of bankruptcy from the Israeli empires sanctions. Now is the time for China to step up and help Turkey get out from under Israeli USSA sanctions and the IMF. This is what Turkey is after, survival.

      • RichardD

        Turkey isn’t on the verge of bankruptcy. It’s national debt to gdp ratio is fairly low:

        http://factsmaps.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/30-countries-with-the-highest-lowest-debt-to-gdp-ratio.png

        • John Brown

          Richard you are totally wrong. Turkey owes most of its debt, private and public in foreign currency like the USSA dollar. Turkey doesn’t have the foreign currency to pay such foreign currency debt.
          https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-08-15/16-billion-reasons-why-turkeys-currency-crisis-will-become-debt-crisis
          16 Billion Reasons Why Turkey’s Currency Crisis Will Become A Debt Crisis
          Earlier this week, when the Turkish lira imploded over the weekend, plunging by the most on record in two consecutive days, bonds of Turkish banks tumbled amid concerns that lira’s slump this year would makes it extremely difficult for lenders to repay dollar-denominated debts or rollover maturities. As a result, numerous bonds issued by Turkish banks tumbled to record lows on Monday: bonds of Yapi Kredi Bankasi AS were among the hardest hit, losing almost 30 cents on the dollar in the past week.
          The reason for the prompt liquidation were investors fears that Turkish lenders would struggle to find the capital to repay about $34.4 billion of bonds sold during a decade of rapid economic growth and historically low global borrowing costs. Turkish banks alone have to service $7.6 billion in USD-denominated debt by the end of 2019.

          • RichardD

            Their debt is very low to start with. They’ll be fine.

  • Ronald

    When, not if,.. “Damascus succeeds in restoring control over Idlib, it will bring large scale military activities in Syria to an end”.
    Syria deserves peace, without Al Qaeda.
    Stand down FUKTUS.

  • Tommy Jensen

    I already recommended S-300 to Assad which would resolve all problems, but Putin, Peskov, Lavrov and Erdogan refused to listen to my words and alternative media remained silent about it.

    Now they realize I was right when its too late. It all ended up in a quagmire because they refused to listen to my words.