Russian Private Military Contractors Expand Their Operations To Sudan – Reports

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Russian private military contractors are now operation in Sudan, according to a video circulating online. The video shows a training of 3 Sudanese fighters supervised by some person behind the scene. The person speaks in Arabic with a Russian accent. At 0:30 the person clearly says in Russian “Stop! Fuck! Were’s your kambulya [grenade]!”

In November, Sudan’s chairman of Defense and Security committee Al-Hadi Adam Hamid anounced that the country is willing to house a Russian military base on the Red Sea shore, as it should help fight contraband and slavery. He noted that setting up a base in the country would be reasonable, calling the decision “marvelous”.

The video below was originally released by SouthFront on January 28, 2017:

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  • Expo Marker

    Although this can be seen as a good sign US-Saudi influence is waning, I would be wary to work with a country who actively kill in Yemen with Saudi Arabia and the UAE.

    • Justin

      Sudanese in Yemen or somali?
      Also dont forget tat there is Sudan and South Sudan!

      • George King

        The separation movement between north and south Sudan started more than five decades ago. The population of North Sudan are mostly Muslim and speak Arabic, whereas the south is mainly Christian and animist, and still abides by tribal allegiances.

        Northern Sudan reaped the benefits of Egyptian colonization in the 19th Century, and as a result is more populated, urbanized and has greater infrastructure than the south. Russia is a Christian values country but in the Federation has Muslim populations and Chechnya is a good example of co-operation and working relationships between rational nation states.

        This is another win-win in Sudan for the Christian South and Northern Muslims with out outside Empire intervention to form vassal states for pillage of the oil rich South Sudan. The Sudan is as much an entry to the African continent as is Libya. The One Belt initiatives will benefit as much as Sudan to bring peace and co-operation outside of Empire.

        One must specify specifics when mentioning who has participated in interventionist via terrorism participation in other countries by the Sudanese.

        Example: Sudan’s decision to provide arms to the rebels — bucking its own international supporters and helping to cement its reputation for fueling conflict — reflects a politically risky balancing act. Sudan maintains close economic and diplomatic ties to Iran and China.

        Both nations have provided military and technical assistance to Sudan’s state-run arms industry and might see sales of its weapons by Sudan to help rebels in Syria as an unwanted outcome of their collaboration with Khartoum, or even as a betrayal.

        In interviews, Sudanese officials denied helping arm either side in the Syrian war. “Sudan has not sent weapons to Syria,” said Imad Sid Ahmad, the press secretary for President Omar Hassan al-Bashir.

        Al-Sawarmi Khalid Saad, a spokesman for the Sudanese armed forces, added that the allegations defied common sense, except perhaps as a smear. “We have no interest in supporting groups in Syria, especially if the outcome of the fighting is not clear,” Mr. Saad said. “These allegations are meant to harm our relations with countries Sudan has good relations with.”

        Russian as part of the One Belt, One Road of China and Iran is a fit and a climb out from under Empire. Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has chosen well the direction for the future of both North & South Sudan.

      • Graeme Rymill
  • Tudor Miron

    That video made me lough :D

    • You can call me Al

      Thank God you said that, I was not sure whether to or not.

      Sudanese special forces at there best hey ??!!!

      • Tudor Miron

        At their very best but that’s OK – they are just learning. Instructors comments mixing Russian with local “kambulya” sounded funny.