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Russian Navy Gets New Commander-in-Chief

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Russian Navy Gets New Commander-in-Chief

Admiral Nikolay Evmenov

On May 8, 2019, President Vladimir Putin signed a decree appointing Admiral Nikolay Evmenov as Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy.

Admiral Evmenov, 57, replaced Admiral Vladimir Korolyov, 64, who was appointed the Navy commander in 2016. The new chief of the Navy is a career submariner. He spent most of his career in the Pacific Fleet before becoming Chief of Staff and then the commander of the Northern Fleet.

SouthFront has repeatedly covered and analyzed issues with the Russian Navy.

Over the past years, the Navy’s leadership has not been able fully solve the appointed tasks as well as cope with all the security challenges faced by Russia. The decision of the Russian top leadership to change the commander-in-chief may be seen as another confirmation to the provided analysis.

According to experts, the inability of the previous commander-in-chief to ensure a proper coordination between the military-industrial complex and the Navy. This created a situation when both the Navy and enterprises of the military-industrial complex were trying to put responsibility for the established situation on each other.

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  • Toronto Tonto

    They seem to rotate stock frequently in Russia and then the retired guy dies .

  • Harry Smith

    In accordance with the official Russian MoD site Currently the Navy’s objectives are as follows:

    • to deter the use of military force or the threat of its use against the Russian Federation;
    • to protect through military methods the sovereignty of the Russian Federation in its internal sea waters and territorial sea, its sovereign rights in the exclusive economic zone and continental shelf; to protect the freedom of the high sea;
    • to provide and maintain required conditions for the security of Russia’s maritime activities in the world’s oceans and seas;
    • to ensure Russia’s naval presence in the world’s oceans and seas, demonstrate the flag and military force and support visits of Navy’s ships;
    • to participate in the international community’s military, peacekeeping and humanitarian operations serving the interests of the Russian Federation;

    • RGtz98

      I think its issues of producing ship engines , etc as most naval facilites were located in the Ukraine-SSR, and after their independence and especially the coup of 2014, they have had trouble producing ‘Big’ ships since they lack the facilities and might take them years-decades to build or recover said facilities.

      • Toronto Tonto

        That is fact , Russia simply does not have the expertise .
        They do however have the power to invade Ukraine and kill 13000 people and putins plans for a land corridor to crimea are history .

        • Sinbad2

          כלב

      • FlorianGeyer

        This may be true ,BUT Big Ships will only provide BIG targets and BIG crew losses that in todays ‘connected world’ would create dissent at home.

        Even in WW2, the news of a ship loaded with thousands of British soldiers that was sunk by German forces, was censored and kept from the British public for years after the war ended.

        https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-33092351


        Walter was in the water for around four hours before he was picked up. When he eventually returned to England, he was ordered – along with the other survivors – to not speak a word about the Lancastria.

        He never saw his friend Charlie again. Walter assumed, to his dying day in 1989, that Charlie was killed in the sinking.

        But Charlie had also survived. Years later, he helped Mark to piece together the stories of the Lancastria. He passed away four years ago, the last Scottish survivor to die.”

        • PZIVJ

          A full two weeks after Dunkirk. It was an act of desperation to pack so many onto the Cunard liner, not just soldiers. But 2500 did survive.

          • FlorianGeyer

            Survive , some of them did , and all were told to keep quiet . Information was tightly censored then and there were no other networks other than the BBC and the censored press really.

            I would think that in the event of a major war today, that all the social media platforms such as this would be shut down.

        • FreePalestine_BDS

          You don’t need to go back all the way to WW2: the survivors of the zio attack on the USS Liberty are still not allowed to speak out.

          • FlorianGeyer

            Yes, even though books have been written about it as well.
            It is yet another event that involves Israel , that the US wants to bury in the ‘memory hole’.

            It would not to for the dumbed down US electorate to have proof that Israel murders American’s.

          • RGtz98

            But big ships are needed in order to have hegemony of the sea, but I concur they are bigger targets and offensive in nature , but you can’t compare a Kirov Class vs those new ‘project’ ships with only 1-2 missiles.

          • FreePalestine_BDS

            True, on the other hand, the mother of big war ships, the aircraft carrier, is a sitting duck.

      • Harry Smith
    • FlorianGeyer

      I suspect a Ukranian has been supplying a negative to SouthFront again :)

      • Harry Smith

        I think they just have wrong sources in Russia.

    • Sinbad2

      Sorry I don’t speak Hebrew.

  • Assad must stay (gr8rambino)

    i hope he is the best commander yet and i wish him best of luck and success

  • FlorianGeyer

    “The decision of the Russian top leadership to change the commander-in-chief may be seen as another confirmation to the provided analysis.”

    The decision may also be due to the 64 year old admiral just wanting to retire.

    I retired at 64 and have never regretted it.
    It is just another chapter of ones life, and working til we die is rather silly in my opinion.

    • FreePalestine_BDS

      64? That’s old …. 55 here, and have never been happier in my life before ;-)

      • FlorianGeyer

        I agree.