Russian Military To Sign Contract For Su-57 Warplanes By End Of Summer

Donate

Russian Military To Sign Contract For Su-57 Warplanes By End Of Summer

Su-57. FILE IMAGE: Sergey Bobylev/TASS

The Russian state-run news agency TASS reports (source):

Russia’s United Aircraft Corporation (UAC) and the Russian defense ministry plan to sign a contract for the firth batch of Su-57 fighter jets by the end of this summer, probably at the 2018 Army forum, UAC President Yuri Slyusar said on Sunday.

“By the end of the summer, I think probably at the Patriot Park (in Moscow’s region, the venue for the 2018 Army forum on August 21-26 – TASS), we will sign contracts for the first batch with the defense ministry. Regular supplies will start next year,” he said in an interview with the Deistvuyushchiye Litsa (Political Actors) program on the Rossiya-1 television channel.

The Russian fifth-generation Su-57 fighter jet features stealth technology with the broad use of composite materials, is capable of maintaining supersonic cruising speed and is furnished with the most advanced onboard radio-electronic equipment, including a powerful onboard computer (the so-called electronic second pilot), the radar system spread across its body and some other innovations, in particular, armament placed inside its fuselage. These planes are expected to arrive for the troops in 2019. The pilot batch will comprise 12 Su-57 planes.

Donate

SouthFront

Do you like this content? Consider helping us!

  • occupybacon

    The small batch is designated for Admiral Kuznetsov, some of the innovations including water sports vests for the pilots.

    • Ivan Freely

      I know you’re joking but just in case, the Su-57 is far too large for the Adm K.

      • occupybacon

        Thanks for letting me know but I think any toy not landing on taking off perpendicularly is too large for Adm K.

        • Bob

          The MiG-29K is right size with ridiculous maneuverability – the procurement policy is to replace most of the larger Su-33’s as approach end of air-frame cycle with 29K’s, as these already in production line for Indian exports.

          • occupybacon

            If anything on that airplane is ridiculous – then it’s fit for Admiral Kuznetsov – which is the jester of the seas.

          • Ivan Freely

            Not true. Look at China’s Liaoning (CV-16). They’ve conducted air, including night, operations with success using the J-15 (a variant of the Su-33). Sure the sortie rate is much lower than an CATOBAR carrier but it’s doable.

            The Adm K is a jester because of lack of funding for maintenance. Finally, he is getting the much needed refit now.

          • occupybacon

            Probably China flies them with wooden missiles, like the ones NK parades – double advantage: almost no load and they float.

          • Gary Sellars

            if anything is ridiculous its your endless empty-headed trolling about things you clearly know nothing about. Oh well, if HATO wants to waste its <2% GDP shekels on clowns on you, who am I to complain?

          • occupybacon

            Thank you, you assume that I’m paid, that means something for me.

          • Gary Sellars

            Whores are paid for their services… but it’s nothing to be proud of.

          • occupybacon

            You know better from your mom.

          • Gary Sellars

            Oh, how very adult of you, resorting to a grade school quip…. Thanks for highlighting your low calibre nature (and basement-level educational standards).

          • Bob

            Ahh, I see you are a dreary troll with no interest in the actual topic.

          • Bob
          • Gary Sellars

            In practise the Su-33s have not logged a lot of airframe flight hours, so they can be readily life-extended. The Navy will choose the best and update them with new radars & weapons and deploy them as dedicated air superiority assets. They may even give them the SVP-24 ballistic computer as well to give it a decent strike capability with cheap iron bombs (its been well received by Su-24 pilots in the Syrian jihadi-shootup).

          • Bob

            That makes lot of sense vis-a-vis the subsequent decision to refurbish and upgrade a larger percentage of the existing Naval Su-33 inventory.

      • Gary Sellars

        Actually the Su-57 is dimensionally smaller than the Su-33 navalised Flanker currenltly carried by the K. The Su-57 would need to be modified with folding wings, strengthened undercarriage and probably additional anti-corrosion measures in order to serve with the Navy. Not impossible, but not currently under development as far as anyone knows.

        • Ivan Freely

          There’s one problem. It’s easier to convert from a navalized fighter. All one has to do is remove the tail hook and, if applicable, the catapult launch bar on its nose wheel (IIRC) like the Canadian CF-18.

          The opposite doesn’t always apply. Why? The airframe has to be redesigned for launches in a short distance and be sturdy enough to withstand the abrupt forces of launching from and recovering on a pitching deck. Essentially you have a completely new design. And if you go through the trouble and expense, you might as well design it for catapult launch carriers.

          The Russian Navy will be building another aircraft carrier and hopefully it’ll be a CATOBAR type. These STOBAR carriers are simply too restrictive, which the Chinese have discovered. Thus, their 3rd carrier (currently under construction in Shanghai) will be a CATOBAR carrier. No idea if EMALS or steam and nuclear powered or not.

          • Gary Sellars

            I read your response, and generally agree. STOBAR is more limited, but it depends on the intended mission. The K for instance was developed as an air-superiority carrier, not a strike carrier. Her Su-33s would be launched with AAMs only (no heavy bombs) and can be launched will a fully effective weapon load and adequate fuel for mission – an Su-33 launched from the long run position (from the centre-line of the angled deck) can carry a full fuel load and AAM loadout IIRC.In comparison, the USN needs CATOBAR as they intend to use their aircraft for strike missions and drop a load of bombs on some poor 3rd-world or developing nation.

            The Chinese probably will use Liaoning and Type 001A for air superiority, and adopt CATOBAR for heavier strike purposes.

            Re the Su-57, I think the airframe will certainly be suitable for STOBAR as it just requires takeoff on full reheat, and upgraded undercarriage for bow ramp-induced stresses (and landing stress of course). . Agree that if its ever used with a cat, then may require additional airframe strengthening, but its conjecture without hard facts.

    • Barba_Papa

      >>water sports vests for the pilots<<

      So……., the pilots engage in the sexual fetish of peeing on each other? :-)

      Sorry, I couldn't resist.

      • occupybacon

        No, they pee only on themselves when taking off from the “Cruise-Missile-Launcher-Carrier”

        • Bob

          If it was easy then everyone would want to do it!

          • occupybacon

            It is said those who still wanna do that are called “The Russian Daredevils”

          • Bob

            Alas, I see you are a dreary troll with no interest in the actual topic.

          • occupybacon

            Oops, I didn’t realize that buying 12 planes, once dubbed “F-35 killer” could be a serious “topic” for some poor people. Did sanctions hurt that much?

          • Bob

            Oops, the only thing the F-35 procurement project is capable of killing is the US middle class tax-paying base.

          • occupybacon

            From around 3500 of the F-35, over 1000 are ordered by foreign countries. That’s almost half of the entire Russian fleet. Worried about U.S. middle class? 1 in 6 retires is a millionaire. 1 in 4 – half-millionaire. Hungry yet?

          • Bob

            ‘1 in 6 retires is a millionaire.’

            The aging boomer population and their combined on-paper 401k/home values. Retirees…that’s who you are citing as the US middle class…lol

          • occupybacon

            So? they spend on military 3.1% of gdp and can afford 10 aircraft carriers. How is that “killing” their middle class tax-paying base, if Russians can afford to pay 4.3% and they can’t have a single one?

          • Bob

            Divert, divert, divert. The F-35 program is a vast military welfare exercise – siphoning off colossal sums of public money – the most expensive military project in modern history, no less. This comes at a time when the real incomes of the actual tax-paying middle class North Americans have not substantially increased since the 1970’s.
            Try reading some actual data on the topic:

            https://www.brookings.edu/blog/social-mobility-memos/2018/06/05/seven-reasons-to-worry-about-the-american-middle-class/

            http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2015/12/09/the-american-middle-class-is-losing-ground/

          • occupybacon

            I wouldn’t care less than how hungry American middle class is today. I’d say F-35 started to sell pretty well over seas – around 1000 ordered before seeing any real action. Boy, 12 planes? I’m cracking myself

          • Bob

            ‘I wouldn’t care less than how hungry American middle class is today.’

            Interesting lack of concern or empathy, given you have previously implied you are North American, is this not the case then, are you actually in Tel Aviv by any chance…lol.

          • occupybacon

            I think people from Tel Aviv have a better English than me. Are you as concerned about the Russian’s bellies as you are about the American’s?

          • Bob

            Divert, divert, divert. Perhaps another in line from Moshav-Yatzitz?

          • occupybacon

            Dunno, but by his name he can afford more planes than Russia Aerospace Forces

    • Gary Sellars

      There is no navalised Su-57, so you are clearly talking shit as the crap-spewing HATOstani troll that we all know you to be.

    • frankly

      Yeah you seem like just the guy.,,,, so clever, why not give us a good rundown on the USS Liberty saga. Especially the part about shooting up the life boats, I suppose that is an Israeli water sport!

      Broad daylight somehow shadowed the brand new oversized American flag she flew. Like dancing in joy on 9/11, only true friends can understand. Personally I just don’t get it. So enlighten us oh wise one.

      What was it the Russian commander signalled in English as she lay dead in the water, “I will standby in case you need me”, the Israelis already tied up at the dock. Soulless.

      • occupybacon

        Yeah man, Bolshoi theater show was extraordinary tonight.

  • Rob

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCiECC-9sIE
    Click on YouTube for better view.
    SECRET SPECS: Russia’s Su-57 Stealthy fifth-generation fighter makes first flight with new engine

    SU-57 due to its speed, stealthy feature and 3D vectoring jet engines is in fact 6th generation multirole fighter jet. 3D vectoring engine is used for better maneuverability and in dogfight. Many features of SU-57 are secret.

    The SU-57 fighter jet Engine is 3D Vectoring while the engine of US F-22 is 2D not good.
    Maximum speed at high altitude is Mach 2.8 (3000 km/hr) while the US F-22 is Mach 2 not good.
    Service ceiling is 30,000 m while the service ceiling of US F-22 is 20,000 not good.
    I have not compared SU-57 fighter jet with US F-35 because F-35 is a joke fighter jet.

    • Ivan Freely

      The F-35 have a different role than the Su-57. So, it’s pointless to make any comparison between the two.

      • Pave Way IV

        The F-35 is designed to bankrupt any air force, US or ally, that gets conned into buying them. It’s not the up front cost, but the cost to keep them flying. That’s a problem if you have to constantly train a limited number of new pilots to replace old ones leaving your air force. Quickest way for the military to lose experienced pilots is to limit their flying time, and the F-35 automatically does that for them.

        The Su-57 isn’t cheap, either. But it’s a hell of a lot cheaper per hour of flight time and will not be a maintenance budget black-hole hangar queen. Regardless of F-22 or F-35 vs. Su-57 fantasy face-offs, the reality will be a RuAF that can grind out flight after flight at a turn rate like we’re seeing at Hmeimim. The US would need an additional ‘spare’ 100 or so F-35s to keep up that kind of pace, day after day.

        The F-35 is built for a two or three week intensive air war, tops, in any configuration. Then, the 50 hours of maintenance per flight hour accumulates so much you can’t put it off any longer. 20 flight hours = 1000 hours of maintenance or 40 days in a hangar. And the cost for parts and spares and cost of Lockheed-Martin contractors for all the specialized maintenance for the F-35s as they age? Nobody knows, not even Lockheed-Martin. The Brits (among others) are kind of worried about not being able to budget for sustainment. ‘Trillions’ is a good guess if you intend on using them much.

        • PZIVJ

          I may be wrong here.
          But is maintenance hours = man hours. I would guess the ground crew would be about 5, so 50 = 10 hours downtime ??
          Anyways Russian planes have much better turn around time.
          I admire the SU-25 in Syria for that. :)

          • Pave Way IV

            Generally true for mil aircraft, PZIVJ. F-35 maintenance, however, requires dozens of Lockheed specialist contractors or a limited number of senior mil maintenance guys trained in specific, complex sustainment tasks. Many of the maintenance tasks are sequence-dependent – you can’t start doing one thing until someone else has done their task. There’s also layers of testing and inspection as you perform the F-35 sustainment. You can have a hundred enlisted airmen or marines standing around and all that extra manpower won’t matter if they’re all waiting on a Lockheed contractor to do something (that a half-dozen aircraft also need).

            Spare parts are already a nightmare. Lockheed and the Pentagon say that’s temporary – the logistics chain will ‘mature’ with time. But nobody is going to pre-order or stock the enormously expensive spares and they’ll be discouraged from doing so by HQ. And Lockheed would just as soon have the aircraft sent back to a major depot or their hangars for an extraordinary number of F-35 maintenance tasks. They may as well have stenciled “No user serviceable parts inside” on three-quarters of the access hatches.

            When you make a magic aircraft, your customers better have a magic support budget because their not going to be able to fix most of the magical systems themselves.

        • frankly

          Complicated maintenance + disheartened staff = inevitable failures. Who needs enemies after you sign a contract for these beauties. You know you have gone MIC, when the total cost of the mission exceeds generous insurance payouts to survivors and complete replacement of infrastructure by a factor of 10 or more.

      • Spit

        The F-35 Baby Seal is a Nuclear delivery weapon recon and Bird Catcher.
        So farm the F-35 has proven itself an excellent Baby Seal and a Perfect Bird catcher.

      • Rob

        F-35 is between helicopter and fighter jet. It is faster than helicopter but slower than fighter jet. It can be easily targeted by even S-200 missile.

      • jakoDELETED

        Not true.
        SU-57 “stealth multirole fighter”

        F-35 is “all-weather stealth multirole fighter”

        F-35 have been declared from the start to be “multi-role” fighter jet.
        But the problem was that it was so miserable in some “roles” that now new narrative is to deny that F-35 was ever meant to be “multi-role” fighter jet.

        BAD WEATHER JETS – Fighter jets fit for all types of weather delayed arriving in UK – by ‘adverse weather’
        https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/6460145/all-weather-jets-delayed-by-weather/
        So not “all-weather” jet fighter either…..(Russian jets fly “all-weather” considering that to be normal including extreme cold)

        • chris chuba

          I started getting bad vibes from the program when they started touting the F35 as the ‘quarterback’. Don’t think of it as the fighter that gains air superiority, think of it as the Jet that does fire control for all of the other other missile platforms in the area with its super, duper electronics.

          • jakoDELETED

            “jet that does fire control for all of the other other missile platforms in the area with its super, duper electronics”

            Computer with the wings?!
            It is not AWACS therefore can’t have 360 degrees control of the situation.
            But still having sensors with certain range to discover ground and flying targets to destroy them with “other missile platforms”
            Sounds like reconnaissance and command and control capability in one jet.
            The problem is that Russians seams to be confident that radars tech and air defenses they have combined with their air force are sufficient to stop “invisible” U.S. jets.
            They didn’t rush to produce in numbers SU-57 even with the 1st stage engines.
            They seamed not to be so worried about “invisibility” of those US jets.
            Thus I have impression that F-35 would be having hard time to even reach Russian territory to do scouting, let alone survive there.
            When they started with the program F-35 was suppose to replace all 4th generation jets like F-16,F-15,F-18… But those jets are still around and have some new upgraded versions which speaks volumes about limits of F-35 without anybody saying word.

            “Don’t think of it as the fighter that gains air superiority”

            They have said themselves that F-35 will need protection of F-15 and F-22. And they arrange “air combat” F-35 against A-10 which is the most idiotic thing one can do….

  • chris chuba

    Is it using the engine they want for the final version or the intermediate one?

    • jakoDELETED

      1st batch of 12 jets is produced with “Item 117″ the ” first stage engines”.

      That is the only reason why they will be not produced in bigger numbers. They will be used for training so that they have pilots ready for final SU-57 with “second stage engines”‘5th generation engines. “Second stage engines”‘ will enter production next year and SU-57 the final production model will be started in 2020.

      Go on this page if you want any details on SU-57 and you will find far more than you ever wanted to know on the subject..
      https://thaimilitaryandasianregion.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/sukhoi-t-50-pak-fa-russia/

      • chris chuba

        Thanks. So it has the best state of the art engine but not the final version and also the best state of the art sensors.

        BTW the futuristic radio-photonic sensor design is fascinating. If that gets deployed successfully that will be revolutionary. I wonder why the Pentagon isn’t pulling out their hair demanding another $100B R&D budget to counter the Russian threat. I guess they don’t want to ask for another big increase just yet.

        Your right, it will take a while to go through that website, very detailed and well explained.
        (Oh, have to throw in, ‘Russia only makes junk, U.S. stuff always years better :-)’ I love when I hear that on U.S. military boards. I don’t even bother to respond anymore. Arrogance will be our undoing. Didn’t the U.S. reverse engineer some Soviet missile technology? I kind of recall that the U.S. incorporated some Soviet designs in air-to-air missiles but I forgot the details.)

        • jakoDELETED

          “So it has the best state of the art engine but not the final version”

          Actually “Item 117″ ,”first stage engine” is upgraded 4th generation engine and “Item 30”, “second stage engine” final engine, is completely new 5th generation engine.
          So those are the different engines where ,”first stage engine” was just used as replacement (because in production) while “second stage engine” is still in testing.
          Russians are very good in making confusion with info…specially in giving the names to jets.

          Russians are talking about testing some 6th generation tech on
          SU-57 so I wouldn’t be surprised to be incorporated in the near future as an upgrade of SU-57.
          The race is on for 6th generation and US, Russia and China are already in that race.
          but also Germany & France as new contenders and UK & Japan maybe also.

          ” U.S. stuff always years better ”
          Yes you are right that they had huge blow back over their arrogance
          I have impression that they have calmed down and wised-up ever since…
          And now they try hard to catch up, specially in HYPER-sonic domain.
          USSR had clear advantage in HYPER-sonic tech so in Yeltsin times they have given access to US to some know-how.
          The same goes for Yak-141 (before Lockheed started design of F-35).

  • Ken Nonickname Nonecknom Under

    firth? That has to be first modelled from the examples of fourth and fifth!

    • PZIVJ

      Who really knows.
      The plant may be located next to a firth or fjord ?

  • paul ( original )

    Does anyone know if these planes will come with the new engines?

    • Nosferatu

      good question.

    • jakoDELETED

      No Paul the 1st batch of 12 jets is produced with “Item 117″ the ” first stage engines”.
      That is the only reason why they will be not produced in bigger numbers. They will be used for training so that they have pilots ready for “second stage engines”‘5th generation engines and final SU-57. “Second stage engines”‘ will enter production next year and SU-57 the final production model will be started in 2020.

      Go on this page if you want any details on SU-57 and you will find far more than you ever wanted to know on the subject..
      https://thaimilitaryandasianregion.wordpress.com/2016/04/27/sukhoi-t-50-pak-fa-russia/

    • John Whitehot

      seems that the Su-57 engines really have a huge impact on the collective imaginary of pentagon’s audiences.

      sadness.

      no offence intended.

  • frankly

    Vote the wrong way at the UN and suddenly none of your F-35s will open. Gosh if it was always about the money, how is that gonna change? The threat of an actual invasion really focuses ones attention. Who else presents an actual invasion threat besides F.uk.us and paid participants?