Russia & Turkey Resume Turkish Stream, Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant Projects

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Russia & Turkey Resume Turkish Stream, Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant Projects

© Sputnik/ Sergey Guneev

On August 9, Russia’s President Vladimir Putin said at a joint press-conference with Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan that there is a positive decision to resume works on the Akkuyu nuclear power plant and the Turkish Stream gas pipeline. Erdogan confirmed.

“We have discussed major joint projects in the fields of energy whose resumption require political decisions. The Turkish side has already taken corresponding decisions on the Akkuyu nuclear power plant construction and the Turkish Stream gas pipeline,” Putin said.

“To accelerate this project is one of our pending tasks, and I think it is a right decision,” Erdogan commented resuming of the Turkish Stream.

The Turkish Stream gas pipeline was announced in December 2014. The pipeline’s expected annual capacity is 63 billion cubic meters. The project was suspended in late 2015 after Turkey downed a Russian Su-24 jet in 2015.

Moscow and Anakara signed an agreement to construct and operate Turkey’s first nuclear power plant at the Akkuyu site in May 2010. Some 35 billion kilowatt-hours per year are epxected to be produced by the plant.

The Russian president also added that Moscow has decided to resume charter flights to Turkey.

“We have looked at the option of resuming our charter flights between Russia and Turkey, I think this is a matter of time,” Putin said.

Putin added that visa regime issues between the two countries must be resolved in order to strengthen Russian-Turkish economic ties.

The joint press-conference followed a meeting between Erdugan and his Russian counterpart Recep in the Russian city of St. Petersburg. This was the first meeting since the downing of Russia’s Su-24 in November 2015.

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  • paul

    As in the past I am forced to confess that I do not understand this. Am
    I missing something? How is it possible for the Russians to have any
    trust in the Turks at all ? It seems to me that Putin is far to
    willing to be accommodating to the Turks and indeed to anyone who
    shows even the most superficial reasonableness.

    So what will be the outcome? Will Russia act in good faith only to be
    stabbed in the back when it suites the Turks?

    As I say I do not understand, which is why this post is little more than
    a series of questions.

    • Gryphonne

      It’s a weak move to annoy NATO, whereas Putin would show much more character if he told the Turks to sod off. I can’t believe he is dealing with that trash after losing a plane to this poor excuse of a human, that probably ordered the shoot-down himself.

  • Asil

    1) Russia schooled Turkey and now resumes to make profit with economic partnership.
    2) After the coup attempt, Turkey blames west and US more than ever and seeks for alternatives.
    3) It is bad news for Rebels, Apparently Turkey will reduce its support to the rebels, I think in couple of weeks Allepo will be a deathtrap for rebels.

  • m.Karim

    Russio Turkish agreement are benefucial to both Countries and to Chinese Belt and Road global trade Routes, and possible stability to Middle East!