Russia Invited Syrian Social Nationalist Party To Sochi Conference

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Russia Invited Syrian Social Nationalist Party To Sochi Conference

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On January 14, Dean of Foreign Affairs of the Syrian Social Nationalist Party (SSNP) Hassan Saqr revealed to the Russian news agency Sputnik that Moscow officially invited the party to the upcoming Syrian National Dialogue Congress that’s set to be held in the Russian city of Sochi. The invitation was reportedly handed over to a delegation of the SSNP that’s currently visiting Russia to discuss many issues related to the political and military situation in Syria.

“Russia decided to invite a large part of the Syrian society, and we had some ideas to add some names and parties to complete the success of the conference, it is necessary that the scene is complete … we presented our vision to Mr. Bogdanov [Russia’s Special Presidential Representative for the Middle East] and he welcomed the idea,” Saqr told Sputnik.

Saqr also said that the Sochi conference is the “prefect chance” to move towards the political solution in Syria and said that the conference will lay the ground bases for direct talks between the Damascus government and the opposition inside Syria in the future.

The SSNP is considered the second biggest party in Syria after the ruling Ba’ath party. Many Syrian activists even argue that the SSNP is the most popular party in Syria due to its support for the Syrian Arab Army (SAA) and its secular principles.

An unnamed Russian official source also confirmed to Sputnik that Sochi conference will be held on January 30 and revealed that the conference might be held for a day only. If true, the session on January 30, could be the first of a series of talks that will be held in Sochi city and then possibly inside Syria in the future.

SYRIAN SOCIAL NATIONALIST PARTY, ARAB NATIONALISM AND CONFLICT IN SYRIA

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  • Valery Grigoryev

    Social Nationalist Party…and their symbol reminds me something.

    • Terra Cotta Woolpuller

      What are implying their symbol is based on the old Canadian Participaction Program badges as that country still uses it to develop self image. Canada is a socialist nation and red and white are among it’s flag colors, just as SSNP’s are based on it’s national flag, so what is your point.

      • Weldon Cheek

        I do believe he somehow imagined a swastika!? I could be wrong ?????

        • FlorianGeyer

          I prefer that to the Stars and Stripes of Zio-Marxism.

        • Deo Cass

          Probably. It looks more like a childrens’ wind mill to me. If you want a sylized swastika replica just look at the NATO symbol.

      • Valery Grigoryev

        Not colors, but decorated swastika. And pls don’t explain that it’s just an ancient Indian symbol:)

        • Terra Cotta Woolpuller

          Seems as though you don’t understand how they use the Hurricane symbol for unity, with slogans like “Hurricane” ” Eagles of the Hurricane” ” long live (Greater Syria”, funny how it is a Christian group who draw on a minorities and other religions. Your attempts get more pathetic in trying to make it fit your fantasies.

          • Valery Grigoryev

            I was born in Leningrad. And we are ferocious about use of that symbol.

          • Terra Cotta Woolpuller

            What the Hurricane symbol , then stop watching the weather channels you might get butthurt for nothing. Me personally can’t stand communists anarchists believe they should be executed without hesitation.

  • matt
    • FlorianGeyer

      Both meet at 12 o’clock and both have ordinary people supporting them that favour a better society for all and not the very few.

    • VGA

      The nazi party also had some socialist policies. Do you know what “nazi” stands for?

  • Rodger

    Good move, it will put Assad in the middle of all parties and not on 1 side in a 2 way talk.

  • Bob

    The SSNP are not well known outside of Syria and Lebanon but have long and convoluted history in each. They are often dismissed in middle east studies as small historical curio, but actually had distinct political impact. They started in early 1930’s as an anti-French/ anti-colonial party and absorbed the radical nationalist political ideas of that era and attempted to mold them in response to contemporary Syrian political circumstances. With a primary political platform advocating Syrian self rule based on radical secular nationalism, and an expanded ‘Greater Syria’ territorial concept, with a secondary
    platform of anti-communism and anti-Zionism. This was quite a novel set of concepts in 1930’s Levant politics, and attracted different followers to different aspects of the platform.
    In subsequent decades their platform led them into many ideological and actual open conflicts; against Syrian-Egyptian-Jordanian 1950-60’s Nasser era pan-Arabism, against Syrian Socialist B’aathist’s that saw them banned for decades, against the Lebanese Communist Party, and later on, after a sort of reproachment with Syrian B’aathist leadership, against Lebanese Phalangists and Israeli occupation forces in Lebanese Civil War.
    However, amid all of this drama, the SSNP did have a distinct political policy that was eventually incorporated into Syrian B’aathist state policy. The SSNP was a radical nationalist party, but notably not minority xenophobic in the manner of the 1930’s German style radical nationalism. Quite the opposite – the SSNP were readily inclusive of all Syrian minorities into to the concept of a unified and secular Syrian national identity. Consequently, the SSNP always had a niche popularity amongst Syrian and Lebanese minorities. Because, by advocating for a secular national identity they offered a national identity based on more than simply being a Muslim and/or an Arab. This policy of secular identity, originating with the SSNP, was essentially incorporated by the Syrian B’aathist leadership over time – and it brought with it the minorities support to the Syrian B’aathists.
    Whilst the SSNP remain a niche political party in Syria, their secular radical nationalist ideology makes them inherently anti-sectarian and anti-jihadist, as these concepts and factions threaten Syrian national unity, thus the SSNP have numerous minority based militias fighting with the state against the Sunni sectarian militants.

  • Ronald

    Is it the YPG that had or has the hammer and cycle ?