0 $
2,500 $
5,000 $
3,492 $
2 DAYS UNTIL THE END OF OCTOBER 2020

Munich Security Conference Presents Heavily Biased Research Into Advent Of Right-Wing Extremism

Donate

Munich Security Conference Presents Heavily Biased Research Into Advent Of Right-Wing Extremism

Click to see full-size image

The Munich Security Conference, apart from conventional sources of presumed danger for the west, such as Russia and China, also looks at the advent of right-wing extremism.

The report from the conference, specifically mentions that great resources have been spent on “the war on terror” fighting jihadism after 9/11, but right-wing extremism was allowed to spread almost without issue.

“While its adherents are highly heterogeneous, right-wing extremism commonly refers to the act of supporting or committing violence based on the belief in one’s racial, ethnic, or cultural supremacy, fierce nationalism, and/or opposition to government authority. Less prominent on the public and political agenda, it has killed more people in the United States since 9/11 than the jihadist variant.”

Although most right-wing extremists conduct their attacks alone, they are increasingly embedded in transnational networks. These networks rely on a strong sense of common identity, based on the belief in white supremacy and the perceived need to protect it.

This global “intellectual cohesion of ideas” was evident in the manifestos and social media posts released for example by the perpetrators of Christchurch, Pittsburgh, El Paso, and Halle.

The internet is also quite helpful in right-wing extremists to connect to one another.

“Frequently outpacing jihadist extremists in the use and reach of social media posts, right-wing extremists strongly rely on internet platforms to communicate and disseminate their ideas.”

Beyond the opportunities provided by social media and the internet, the extreme right capitalizes on fears of demographic and socioeconomic change, as illustrated by upticks in violence following the election of the first African American president in the United States or the refugee crisis in Europe.

The fears extremists exploit have been nurtured by far-right, nationalist parties. As such, right-wing extremism is part of a much broader problem: the rise of actors who are mainstreaming radical views and are thereby eroding the fabric of Western liberal democracies from within.

The following graphs are provided:

Munich Security Conference Presents Heavily Biased Research Into Advent Of Right-Wing Extremism

Click to see full-size image

Munich Security Conference Presents Heavily Biased Research Into Advent Of Right-Wing Extremism

Click to see full-size image

Munich Security Conference Presents Heavily Biased Research Into Advent Of Right-Wing Extremism

Click to see full-size image

The provided data set gives some legitimate insight into how right-wing terrorism has developed overtime and where it’s current international hub is – in Ukraine.

At the same time, it heavily misrepresents the number of jihadist extremism events and fatalities. Even a simple glance of various open sources of information would reveal that there are easily over 100 cases of Islamic extremism between September 1st, 2001 and December 31st, 2018. And even if the numbers of events are realistic in the presented graphs, it is also showing that the fatalities are much higher, in regard to the number of events when right-wing and jihadist extremism are compared.

This is a very apparent example of attempting to fit facts to the desired narrative and not constructing the narrative based on what has really happened and working from there.

MORE ON THE TOPIC:

Donate

SouthFront

Do you like this content? Consider helping us!