Large Anti-Govt Protests Developing In Jordan Despite Prime Minister’s Resignation (Videos)

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Large anti-government protests are developing in Jordan.

The protests started last week over IMF-backed price increases and a new tax reform law and already tirggered resignation of the country’s prime minster, Hani al-Mulki. However, this was not enough to de-escalate the situation.

The protests were organised by the political group known as Hirak Shababi [youth movement] and 33 of professional associations and civil society groups, including Engineers Association and Jordanian Teachers Syndicate. Engineers Association and Jordanian Teachers Syndicate only have an estimated combined membership of 300,000.

Unions representing employees in the public and private sectors also called for a general strike on June 6.

Al-Mulki resigned on June 5. Following his resignation, the protesters vowed to continue their demonstrations expanding their demands to include a complete overhaul of the government’s system and approach.

The demonstrators accused the government of covering up its failed economic approach (resulted in a need of the new tax law) and corruption.

Some protesters are also demanding the dissolution of parliament and a reform of the political system.

The protests were caused by the worsening economic situation in Jordan. It should be noted that one of the reasons contributing to the current economic situation in the country is a high number of refugees from Syria. About 1.4m Syrians had fled the war to Jordan. Only about 20-30% of them are living in the refugee camps. The majority of the refugees is spread throughout the state.

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  • Garga

    Jordan is a special case, being an absolute monarchy but pretending to be constitutional. In 2011 when the “Arab spring” was spreading, king Abdullah joined the protestors in the first row and protested against the prime minister and the government which he chose by himself, sacrificed the PM so he stays in power.
    I guess the same show doesn’t work anymore. It’s amazing they manage to screw their economy themselves, without outside help (counterfeit money, currency manipulation, the whole nine yards which was and is being used against Zimbabwe, Iran, Russia and others). There are millions of refugees in Turkey and Iran too, can’t be the sole cause of economic ruins.

    These protests seem to be genuine since there is no burning down of public assets and no violence from the protestors so far (meaning they’re not orchestrated by agent provocateurs with foreign help).

    One danger flies over Jordan for some decades and with the recent US/Israeli move to eliminate the 2-state solution, this “danger” becomes more and more real: Forcibly removal of all Palestinians in Palestine and throw them into Jordan, with separation of some of eastern bank for a “buffer zone” of course, plus the port of Aqaba to ensure this future country’s isolation and dependence.
    We’ll see if that’s the case if the violence breaks out from protestors side, burning, sniping, etc.

    • Barba_Papa

      Don’t forget that both Turkey and Iran have more robust economies that at least can take a hit or two. Whereas Jordan is basically one giant bowl of sand, has no oil like its richer Arab cousins, not much of a diverse economy, thus heavily reliant on tourism and subsidies from the West and its richer Arab cousins (read Saudi Arabia). So in that sense the influx of 1.2m refugees, and I imagine the scarcity of water thanks to climate change make this kingdom sit on a knife’s edge. It doesn’t take much to make it fall.

  • Hansi Hintern

    OT: More news about Yemen

    @Southfront,

    please bring more news about Yemen. Since a few weeks, Almasdarnews has been reporting almost daily about Yemen, and the situation there is becoming more and more “interesting”. In the upcoming battle around Hodeideh the Houthis will be in severe trouble, on the other hand the attacking forces are suffering heavy casualties at the moment, the Houthis seem to use some of their missiles to attack gatherings of Saudi and UAE forces. Maybe Hodeideh will become their Stalingrad, even if they have air superiority. According to some sources the Israeli airfore is bombing the Houthi forces there, so the Sauds seem to be quite desperate, that’s really important news.

  • TrumanSparks

    If this gets out of hand the US will twist the govt’s arm to go in and crack skulls. They probably would.

  • Ivanus59

    lol, they helped out the FSA scum to wage war and damage Syria and now their country is flooded with refugees and suffers as a result. :] And of course the monarchist regime will now make the masses of common people pay for how the Jordanian elite fucked up their own country (not even speaking about the Syria issue here, I mean other, internal affairs). To me, it looks like the protester’s anger is just!
    Hopefully some sectarian “Islamic” factions don’t take over, the protests are led by syndicates of workers and students. Time will tell…

    • Sinbad2

      To be fair, Jordan has been ruled by the USA for a long time, they are forced to support the terrorists by the Americans.

      And it’s not just Jordan, Europe has been flooded with refugees fleeing the American death machine.
      European leaders and of course Jordanian leaders are not allowed to point the finger at the nation that has brought so much chaos and despair to the world, because if they did, their country would also be destroyed by the USA.

      The USA has to be stopped, one way or another.

      • Joe Dirt

        The whole world is ruled by the USA, get over it! :D

        • Bob

          Guess what, the US regime change plans for complete political control of Syria have comprehensively failed, Joel.

  • Smaug

    How lightly the Arabs switch sides, notice how they cast more bricks than they do votes.
    .
    The reason such a big movement occurred over a comparitively minor issue is because of the sheer volume of racketeers. People at every level Jordanian society see these protest as a way to loot, gain a government office, or discredit personal rivals.

  • Sinbad2

    “About 1.4m Syrians had fled the war to Jordan.”

    America, the gift that keeps on giving.

  • goingbrokes

    This is how it started in Syria. Soon there could be more waves of immigrants to Europe, since the law-abiding and compassionate neighbours (KSA and Israel) will take none, except card-carrying salafist militants. many would escape to Syria but there would be a fifth column among them. The global banking jihad must continue, another Arab country must be stripped and chaos must prevail. The thirst for blood (and resources) has not been quenched. Jordan is not the first price, but it’ll have to do for now. A failed Jordan will allow Israel, Saudis and UZA to keep forces on Syrian southern border for a long time. This is not over yet.

  • The Farney Fontenoy

    Let the puppet king of Jordan reap what he sowed…