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In 2019 Russian Armed Forces Received Least Number of Aircraft Since 2011

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In 2019 Russian Armed Forces Received Least Number of Aircraft Since 2011

Click to see full-size image

In 2019, there was a significant reduction in the supply of new military aircraft to the Russian Armed Forces, according to a summary provided by the BMPD military blog.

In fact, in 2019, the Russian Aerospace Forces received only relatively small batches of Su-35S fighter jets and Su-34 front-line bombers – a total of 18 aircraft (ten Su-35S and eight Su-34).

The last time the Russian Armed Forces receive such a small number of warplanes was in 2011.

For the first time in a while, in 2019, the Armed Forces of Russia received no Su-30SM fighter jets and Yak-130 combat training aircraft.

The first two pre-serial production MiG-35 fighter jets were delivered to the Russian Ministry of Defense for testing, but the stage of the program and its general state are unclear.

The long-awaited delivery of the first serial prototype of the fifth-generation fighter Su-57, the first built by Komsomolsk-on-Amur aviation plant didn’t happen.

The first one to be delivered crashed during factory trials on December 24th, shortly before being delivered to the Russian Aerospace Forces.

At the same time, the Ministry of Defense concluded a serial contract in 2019 for the purchase of 76 Su-57 fighter jets for the Russian Aerospace Forces.

In 2020 the situation with the supply of aviation equipment will not fundamentally change compared to 2019, and more significant deliveries of combat aircraft under new contracts will occur only in 2021. The Su-57 fighter jets are to expected to begin being delivered, under serial production in 2021.

What warplanes the Russian Armed Forces received in 2019:

  • 8 Su-34 front-line bombers. Of this number, six Su-34 aircraft built by the NAZ under the state defense order in 2019 were received for the rearmament of the 2nd Guards Combined Aviation Regiment of the 21st Combined Aviation Division of the 14th Smolensk Red Banner Army of the Air Force and Air Defense of the Central Military District, located at the Shagol airfield; Two more Su-34s were delivered by NAZ to the Russian Ministry of Defense in early December 2019, but so far their side numbers and deployment have not been reported. The total number of Su-34s built under all contracts, including seven prototypes and pre-production models, reached 134 units.
In 2019 Russian Armed Forces Received Least Number of Aircraft Since 2011

Su-34. Click to see full-size image

  • 10 Su-35S fighter jets. In 2019, Komsomolsk-on-Amur Aviation Plant delivered 10 such jets to the Russian Aerospace Forces. The first six Su-35S fighters manufactured by KnAAZ under the state procurement order of 2019 entered the 790th fighter aviation regiment of the 105th mixed aviation division of the 6th Leningrad Red Banner Army of the Air Force and Air Defense of the Western Military District, deployed at the Hotilovo airfield in the Tver region; The last four Su-35S fighters built by KnAAZ under the state procurement order of 2019 were transferred on November 12, 2019 to the Russian Vityazi aerobatics aviation group in the Kubinka suburban area of ​​Moscow. The Russian Aerospace Forces have so far received 88 serial Su-35S aircraft since the end of 2012 to date.
In 2019 Russian Armed Forces Received Least Number of Aircraft Since 2011

Su-35S. Click to see full-size image

  • 2 MiG-35 fighter jets. In June 2019, the Russian Aerospace Forces were transferred two pre-production, experimental MiG-35S fighter jets – a single-seat MiG-35S and a double-seat MiG-35UB.
In 2019 Russian Armed Forces Received Least Number of Aircraft Since 2011

MiG-35UB. Click to see full-size image

In comparison, in 2018, the Russian Armed Forces received 50 warplanes, 14 Su-30SM fighter jets, 12 Su-34 front-line bombers, 10 Su-35S fighter jets, and 14 Yak-130 combat training aircraft.

In 2017, a similar number of aircraft was delivered. The years 2014, 2015 and 2016 were strong, seeing delivers of 70 and above warplanes.

The specific numbers between 2008 and 2019 can be seen in the table below:

In 2019 Russian Armed Forces Received Least Number of Aircraft Since 2011

Click to see full-size image

In 2019 Russian Armed Forces Received Least Number of Aircraft Since 2011

IL-76MD-90A. Click to see full-size image

As for the supply of non-combat aircraft to the Armed Forces of Russia in 2019, they received three serial military transport aircraft Il-76MD-90A, two of these aircraft were built back in 2018 and only one was constructed in 2019. Since it was originally planned that in 2019 Aerospace Forces will receive five Il-76MD-90A aircraft, thus it can be assumed that the program for their production is being delayed.

Overall, it was a year of limited deliveries in terms of warplanes for the Russian Armed Forces.

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  • Damien C

    For the size of the threat massed against Russia these numbers would be worryingly low to provide a sufficient deterrent

    • Z.P.

      I beg to differ.
      Russia today is Super Power (when it comes to nukes) and hyper-sonic weapons literally second to none!
      That is Russia’s main deterrent against any attack including all out US-NATO invasion.
      They will nuke the s**t out of them before they even come close to border.
      Russian airplanes are just complementary force to the best air defenses in the world to keep enemy outside of Russia.
      Since Russia have no intention to invade anybody number of planes is more than enough with hundreds of thousand’s of missiles in S-400, S-350, S-300, BUK M2, M3, Thor, Pantsir to stop anybody.
      If ever NATO even tries to bring thousands of airplanes close to Russia the airports will be destroyed with tactical nukes.

      • ruca

        Yeap!

      • BlueHeadLizard

        If Russia ‘lower conventional defence levels’ are weak it has to escalate to nukes quickly, how does it handle the nukes coming back?

        • Z.P.

          Russia’s ‘lower conventional defense levels’ are “lower” only in relative sense when compared to more powerful nuke power potential.
          Russia can conventionally fight against anybody except that kind of fight can’t last for very long time against combined US-NATO forces.
          Since Russian industrial and human resources are limited comparing to US-NATO.
          So it would be only question of very short time before the 1st tactical nukes would start to fly towards enemy. Depending on the level of the conflict and the speed of escalation.
          Russia has proscribed in her strategy use of nuclear tactical weapons against ANY aggressor on Russian Federation.
          The main obsession in Russia is to NEVER again they permit invaders to repeat WW2 experience with Russia completely destroyed and population severely exposed to extremely hostile enemy.
          Every significant invaders will be nuked before they even come close to the border.
          That is the only plan.
          Once nukes start to fly and MAD is activated we are all dead or dying more or less or about to die …

      • Dick Von Dast’Ard

        Don’t even need tactical nukes, conventional thermobaric and HE weapons would be just as effective practically and less politically risky for the Russian leadership to deploy against U.S. misled Nato airbases. (assuming it lasts Trumps presidency)

        • Z.P.

          Good point, but what you neglect big time there is the range of those “conventional” weapons.
          All that immense conventional fire power will be used to destroy anything that NATO can send to invade Russia.

          Tactical nukes range (in only 2 types of missiles and there are many others)are for “Iskander”tactical nukes 650+Km range and above.
          While “Kinzhal” is 3000Km range and MACH-12 speed and nothing conventional comes even close since their range and speed.
          Since conventional in general doesn’t go ever over 100Km range and to use conventional warhead”Iskander” for 600Km away target doesn’t make much sense since tactical nuke will do much better job!
          One needs plenty of 500Kg Iskander conventional warheads to destroy whole airport and airplanes.
          Tactical nukes are must.
          Not even to mention incredible speed with which can tactical nukes destroy targets before even first airplanes take off the ground.
          So there is no alternative to tactical nukes in destruction of the enemy military airports, naval bases and military bases and principal command centers in Eastern and Central Europe.

    • BlueHeadLizard

      Good point. NATO talking about 1000s of the F35 with USA, UK etc. Ok doubts about some of its capability as it tries to be a “bus and ferrari” all in one, but still 1000’s.

  • Z.P.

    It would be good if they would stop production of S-30SM altogether and produce only SU-35S, MIG-35 and SU-57.
    Those existing SU-30SM will have big upgrade with all the bells and whistles from SU-35 including engines.
    So Russia will have only 3 types of combat multi role airplanes really ( 4th generation) to service. With SU-30 that will become almost identical to SU-35 in many things.
    So that will make savings in maintenance.

  • swedish_viking

    Hopefully they will be able to deliver 36 Yak-30 to Syria.

    • d’Artagnan

      To revamp its military-industrial base Russia needs to focus on exporting to allies like Iran, Syria, Iraq, India, China, Algeria and other nations that have historically been friendly to Russia and the old USSR. Only a robust export market will free up enough capital to invest in the modernization of Russia forces as well as revamping R&D. The positive Russian experience in Syria will also prove invaluable in enhancing the effectiveness and combat capability of Russian weapons systems. The trail by combat of the SU-35 and SU-34 has already proven them to be the best aircraft in the world, considering 5 years of non-stop combat operations in a very difficult environment with zero losses. This has been the best advertisement for the new generation of Russian weapons that passed the baptism of fire with flying colors.

      • FlorianGeyer

        Russian equipment has always been durable and designed for war.

        This is why we still see Russian made tanks and artillery manufactured in the 1950’s and 60’s in every day use, even in wars, by many Non NATO countries today.

        How many NATO nations have produced equipment that endures time itself?

        Bells and Whistles are all very well, BUT in war it is necessary to have equipment that does not need to spend 50% of its time in a specialist maintenance facility.

    • Justin

      Russia has an over stock of SU-25’s. These are better suited to Syria since there is less risk from MANPADS and the Syrian forces tend to need more ground support (which is what the YAK-130) supplies!
      If anything, this is the aircraft Syria would prefer!
      But u do get more bang for your buck with the Yak-130!
      Its very modern and light but just doesnt have the armour to protect against anti-air guns!
      Pilots cost money! They need armour!

      • swedish_viking

        The thing is that Syria ordered 36 Yak-30 in 2012 that should have been delivered in 2014-2016 according to the order.
        But i think sanctions delayed the delivery.

        • Justin

          u keep saying Yak-30!
          i think u mean the Yak-130!
          I didnt think sanctions mattered in regards to Syria! Russian’s have disregarded them since 2015! The S-300 was a huge deal breaker all on its own!

          • swedish_viking

            Yes you are correct it’s a typo it should be YAK-130

  • jm74

    Russia may not have the pilots to fly them hence they are holding off.

    • d’Artagnan

      Russian military is very cost effective and a pilot shortage is not the issue. Post USSR period from 1990-2000 Russia was in internal turmoil and deteriorating economic situation, but now Russia has stabilized and can free up enough financial resources to focus on military modernization. However, seeking new export markets and creating joint production with technically advanced nations like Iran and India will also help. Tapping into the Iraqi market with Iranian assistance will also be a good idea. Iraq for three decades prior to US invasion was a key importer of Russian/Soviet weaponry.

      • Z.P.

        You would make good journalist in some military site.
        You are quite good with words also.

      • jm74

        Flying a MIG29 is far different to flying a SU35 or 57; special training is required and to have endless planes in mothballs awaiting a qualified pilot is bad economics.

    • Z.P.

      Women will jump in.
      I am as conservative traditionalist but this is one of military activities which women can do quite well.
      So if they stick with the choppers and other non combat jets, that will make more men available for combat jets

      • John Wallace

        Don’t worry , women can be very good in combat as well. Very dedicated and assertive.

      • jm74

        During WW2 the Russian female pilots were more feared than the men; my grandfather told me that years ago and he was in Russia at the time.

        • Z.P.

          So your grandfather was on receiving end…?
          No need to exaggerate or make things up since women have their important place in defending Russia
          Female pilots were in huge number of cases only flying small attack bombers.
          That is the reason why they were so “feared”since they would bomb troops on the ground by flying low and dropping bombs on them which would in general create panic.
          Fighter pilots with their few machine guns couldn’t possibly create the same commotion on the ground. Their role was to fight German fighter airplanes and take down German bombers not to create panic on the ground.

          Night Witches
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_Witches

    • FlorianGeyer

      I somewhat doubt that.
      What evidence do you have for your speculation, jm74?

      • Z.P.

        It is quite possible but not in dramatic scale..
        Even India that is over BILLION in population has at the moment that problem.
        So all that is organisational problem with the schools and recruiting and also takes better salaries and conditions to attract young talented people.
        That’s all there is to it

      • jm74

        No evidence just making an educated guess Florian.

        • FlorianGeyer

          Time will be the arbiter then.

  • BlueHeadLizard

    The most beautiful jets. The curve at the front makes them look biological, not mechanical. My personal favourite the ‘Duck ‘ SU34.

    • John Wallace

      Yes I was thinking bird like myself , beautiful looking machines . Pleased I am not the only one that sees that.

  • Dick Von Dast’Ard

    How many MiG-31’s and Tu-22M were updated to fire hypersonic weapons?

  • Dick Von Dast’Ard

    Has SF got any information on the likely serial production numbers of the Su-70?

  • Kananda

    no money, few dance