Government Forces Break ISIS Defense, Capture Southern Part Of Hajar al-Aswad District(Map, Video)

Donate

Government Forces Break ISIS Defense, Capture Southern Part Of Hajar al-Aswad District(Map, Video)

Click to see the full-size map

On May 5, the Syrian Arab Army (SAA), the Palestinian Liberation Army (PLA) and their allies captured the southern part of the strategic al-Hajar al-Aswad district, south of the city of Damascus, according to the Syrian Arab News Agency (SANA).  The SANA said that the SAA is now clearing the liberated area from mines and IEDs.

The SAA and its allies split the ISIS-held pocket south of Damascus on May 3 capturing several key positions between the al-Hajar al-Aswad district and the Yarmouk refugee camp.

From its side, the ISIS linked news agency Amaq claimed that ISIS fighters killed 90 SAA soldiers and damaged a BMP-1 armored vehicle of the SAA during the clashes in al-Hajar al-Aswad district and the Yarmouk refugee camp in southern Damascus on May 4 and 5. However, most of these claims were not verified.

Currently, ISIS fighters control more than 80% of the Yarmouk camp, less than 20% of the Hajar al-Aswad district and a few positions in the al-Tdamon district. The SAA and its allies are expected to launch a final ground attack on ISIS positions in Yarmouk, once al-Hajar al-Aswad is fully secured.

Donate

SouthFront

Do you like this content? Consider helping us!

  • Michał Hunicz

    Great news, smash them all!

  • R3mba

    kill em all.. no POWs

  • Rob

    Due to fear the Israeli migrants have pissed in their trousers. These morons spied on Damascus for Netanyahu and MI6.

  • Barba_Papa

    Once the last Damascus pocket falls the strategic balance in Syria will shift dramatically. It will be interesting to see what will happen next.

    • jorge

      The liberation of all de de-escalation zones. East Ghouta is already liberated and North Holms is the very next. Daraa and Quneitra will follow, and in Idlib some regions, at least, will also be liberated. And surely the Homs desert will be cleaned up of what rest of ISIS.

      • Piaciullo

        First of all they must clear the desert (east of Palmyra) and the Euphrate pocket.

    • Rob

      Israel are so afraid that their aeroplanes regularly sneak Lebanese and Syrian borders.

    • Rob

      The Muslim nations will not remain calmn until to erect the Palestinian flag on Tel Aviv.

  • Otto Heinrich Wehmann

    Congratulations, after all camp have been liberated don’t disperse the forces march to Daraa whit a umbrella of SA-22 Greyhound, SA-17 Grizzly and SA-15 “Gauntlet” to engage Israeli Air Force.

  • Drogba

    We will soon find out the true intentions of Putins Russia when the Syrian Forces advance to capture the southern borders.That will prove one way or the other how genuine Russia is in its fight against the real Isis backed terrorists. Israhell.

  • Jim Prendergast

    From Yarmouk Palestinians can exercise their guaranteed right of return to the Golan, with U.N. assistance.

    • as

      UN assistance.

  • Rob

    All Muslim states should expressed their full solidarity with Syria, Palestine and Yemen and restrect their diplomatic relations with US, UK until full unconditional withdrawal from Syria, Palestine, Yemen, Iraq, Libya and Afghanistan otherwise the next number will be yours.

  • Rob

    US and UK are not stupid to spend their money on useless wars. In fact this is Saudi and Israeli money that spend on wars on Muslims.

    • pao

      Lol…now that first part if really funny.

      • Rob

        Saudi tyrent drag UK, US, France into wars with Muslims. If Saudis stop funding them then there will be no war. Recently Saudis have paid US$500Billion to US what do you think that is for weapons, no. The weapons cost is not so much as much they have paid.

        • pao

          If the US did not have SA to buy their weapons, the FED will just print more money and donate the weapons to their proxies militants, either through other countries or directly. Do you really think the US will really stop manufacturing weapons? The Middle East is their bread and butter.

        • Politolog Externista

          when I see ROb, I expect simplistic wishful thinking from an islamist proletariat point of view … You try hard and type the stuff you wish would either happen or simply you think that the saudis are worse than UK freemasons. They are brothers in crime. Saudis want to be the leading arab power, UK and US want somebody who will be their right hand. They have common interests. USA and UK and saudi oil keep their economy. UKUS sells stuff for saudi proxy armies, US UK give handouts as well. They profit both one from another. The US is afraid of China, Russia and want to take over territory, standard operation of the empire is setting up bases. In the long run, friendship to UKUS/F is detrimental to normal people, but normal people in general are pretty much nothing, unless they get in the elites way. Your focus on islam as the good guys and the rest as darkness shows your ignorance, but the world isnt as black and white as you imply by your posts.

  • That Guy

    After pocket clearance campaign, go clear Daraa and Quneitira, then go to Idlib (and by that, no more green on the map), then go for ISIS in Homs desert. Now all Daeshbags are done, but still the war is not over, it has only just begun, where a fight between the SAA and US forces east of Euphrates should begin, and it ain’t gonna be a pretty one that’s for sure.

  • Hrky75

    Clearing up ISIL from Damascus and promised Russian rebuilding of Syrian air defenses coupled with victory in Rastan pocket is bound to make Zios and Neocons nervous. Deir Ezzor ISIL pocket is next logical target – and not a hard nut to crack by all accounts. And then comes Daraa and Quneitra – i.e. direct and open confrontation with IDF. My guess is Zios will make US attack Iran before Daraa offensive starts that being the last chance for Israel to stave off the inevitable defeat in Syria…

    • Feudalism Victory

      Trump wont do it.

      • as

        We’ve been there before. All he need is crying Ivanka and social media video from white helmet.

        • Feudalism Victory

          His state department froze the white helmets funding. I think he knows his government is feeding him bad info to discredit and worse make him look stupid. His ego wont stand for the disloyalty or embarressment. He did his best to warn about the last strike and hit only symbolic targets.

          • Hrky75

            The reason he freezed WH funding is they served out their purpose. There are no more “moderate” terrorist pockets in Syria – only Idlib and everyone and his cousin already know that “rebels” there are head chopping Islamist, mostly foreigners.

          • Feudalism Victory

            Thats interesting. So turkeys proxies dont enjoy full(or any) support from the us uk israel and France?

            Very interesting.

          • Hrky75

            Well they don’t really. US bombed more targets in Idlib in 2017 then any other place in Syria apart from Raqqah. US will focus the money and attention on their brand new favorites – the Kurds. Islamist moderate head coppers lost the war on the ground and the sympathies in Washington. Also it’s kinda hard to be pushing the PR narrative of helping the “freedom loving” Al Qaida – the same people you claim to fight with for the better part of 2 decades. They’ll just rehash the good ole “land without people – i.e. everything east of Euphrates – for people without land – i.e. Kurds” story. West seems to buy that particular horse manure, readily. Besides Israelis would rather help the Kurds then Arabs – and have done that consistently for almost 70 years…

          • as

            At least not the one in afrin. I believe the newly created SLF is off of the west coalition paycheck. Among their horses that’s still available i think the HTS, Southern border group, Al tanf group and SDF or YPG.

    • RichardD

      The IDF didn’t do anything of any significance when the SAA took Daraa. It’s unlikely that they’l do anything to prevent the rest of the Golan border from being cleared.

      • Hrky75

        Saudi Arabia and it’s minions controls the price of oil. In case of war with Iran and big hike in price SA will just pump more. Iran would have to close off the Gulf and bomb some of SAs oil fields in order for prices to go up above limits set by US. But that would open them for retaliatory US/Saudi attacks on their own fields – scenario that all sides will try to avoid. It takes about 80 USD/barrel for SA to balance it’s current budget. And b/e price of shale is still around 90 USD/barrel. I believe that all the warring parties would be OK with oil prices peeking at 120-130 USD/barrel . Everyone involved will have enough cash to finance their respective war efforts and the world economy proved already that it can take the prices as high as 140 USD/barrel without triggering a recession. Remember the rules of WW3 – fight your hot wars by proxy, confront your enemy’s economy directly while still keeping the wider international commerce going on. That’s why West still buys most of the resources it needs for making war – aluminium, titanium, oil and gas – from the very country they are making the war on – Russia…

        • RichardD

          You mean the $140 oil price that brought about the 2008 economic crisis that came closer to collapsing the US economy than any other event in modern history? And that’s without a war with Iran which would push the price much higher. I don’t know where you live, but I’m guessing that you’re not an American, I am. And I had a front row seat for that horror show. I completely disagree with your an easy war with Iran scenario. Which is why it’s probably not going to happen.

          • Hrky75

            Nope. Oil price in 2008 was 160 USD. The 140 mark was highest price during recovery in 2009-10 – average price was around 110-120 USD. And I don’t say the war with Iran is an easy thing – that’s why it took 20 years from publishing New American century – the Neocon Bible to actually killing Iranian soldiers in the filed. I’m just saying that a threat of too high oil prices will not stop the Neocon plans with Iran. Especially if Bibi and his thugs organize another false flag to con Trump into attacking…

          • RichardD

            Your reply doesn’t make sense. I just posted a chart showing the price of oil spiking right in the middle of the financial crisis. The price spiked and then the economy collapsed causing demand to drastically decrease, which caused the price of oil to plummet. An Iran war would be worse, possibly catastrophic.
            https://gailtheactuary.files.wordpress.com/2014/05/oil-price-with-oval-over-drop-in-2008.png

          • Chris P

            The housing crisis and unemployment was the real issue. Homeowners defaulting on loans without means to make money. Oil really did not play a huge role in this. Maybe or maybe not. IT is the American and Canadian who stand to win from high oil prices, yet speculations and prices are horribly volatile due to war. China has a stable land supply from Iran and Russian. North America is fine too. Oil deals are made at much lower prices than the market rate too. Say at 60 a barrel on the market, it will actually go for 40$ a barrel, as long a supply is very strong and demand is fairly stable. War prices are not accurate and supply is extremely strong. Cash paying deals are the true reflection of oil prices. Currently those who buy Crude pay about 35$ per barrel and they are completely aware that Supply is not a True problem on Futures. Companies that produce Gas, do deals on Futures/Oil Prices between themselves and not the Stock Market. They commit to purchases at such and such prices six months down the line.

          • RichardD

            The US has a net 20% oil production deficit that has to be imported, and half of it’s domestic supply comes from shale, a short term and environmentally problematic source. The Canadian tar sands are even worse. A rise in oil prices and a global supply deficit coupled with rising interest rates from an Iran war could bring the US to a position of economic collapse worse than 2008.

            It would be the end of the Trump administration and a very stupid thing to do. Few Americans support the Afghan war, the same would hold true for an Iran war. The difference would be the economic and social costs from an Iran war would be much higher and the public opposition to it would be a much bigger problem for the government. Which is why it probably isn’t going to happen.

            The defaults that fueled the housing and credit crisis were driven in part by rising unemployment caused by increasing energy costs. Chrysler and GM both went bankrupt because they couldn’t sell cars. New car dealers were going out of business at record rates. Other energy dependent sectors of the economy suffered similar fates. 2008 wasn’t all energy related. But it wouldn’t have brought the economy to the brink of catastrophic collapse without the surging oil price which had nothing to do with the housing loans.

        • RichardD
          • Hrky75

            http://www.macrotrends.net/1369/crude-oil-price-history-chart

            But let’s not quarrel over +/-10 bucks per barrel – the price was not the point of neither yours nor mine comment. It was the concept of US not attacking Iran over the prospect of too high oil prices alone. But just for the sake of a conversation, let’s entertain for the moment the idea that prices do go over 160 USD and beyond. First one to suffer would be the countries that actually have an industry – namely China. And if a recession does happen, there are 2 proven ways US can take care of it. One is printing more money to bail out the banks and companies and the other was tried successfully in 1940s – fight a world war. Now that’s a scary coincidence, you’ll agree…

          • RichardD

            You seem detached from reality. The price was the point of my comment, and you’re the one talking about $10, not me. What is it about $200+ and that it would severely damage a US economy already in very serious trouble that you don’t understand?

          • Hrky75

            There was already a war against Iran in 1980s and the price of oil still didn’t cause US economy to disintegrate. There are enough other oil producing countries in the world to make up the difference as long as Iran doesn’t find the way to stop the Gulf oil from being shipped out on the market. They tried it in 1980s and failed…

          • RichardD

            There was no oil price spike from the Iran Iraq war, the price dropped. A price spike would have only helped both belligerents, but it didn’t happen. And Iraq could export it’s oil west if the Persian Gulf was closed.

            A war in the Persian Gulf involving the US would disrupt production and the Saudis wouldn’t be able to compensate, especially if their fields were damaged. The price of oil would spike and the US economy which is a net importer would collapse while the Russian economy would surge. And the price would be unlikely to plummet as it did in 2008 when there was no production shortage.

            http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_bhwRN7EbCbA/SZmRgqksHHI/AAAAAAAAACg/Ssl9v92zTyU/s400/oil_price2_466x300gr.gif

          • Hrky75

            But your graph clearly shows that oil price during Gulf war 1 did spike – it was bigger then during 1973 war and subsequent OPEC embargo. US navy making sure the Gulf stayed open and putting Kuwaiti oil tankers under US flag made sure Iraq could export as much as they needed.

          • RichardD

            It briefly returned to previous highs that the US had paid for years, it was a nothing burger compared to 2008 which came close to completely collapsing the economy. The Iranians can easily close the gulf on an as needed basis. Especially with Russian support. Which they would get. An Iran war would be a complete disaster for the US. Which is why it probably isn’t going to happen. No matter how much the evil blood sucking baby rapers want the US to fight one for them.

          • Hrky75

            I agree that 1980s spike was peanuts compared to 2008, but 2008 wasn’t caused by war. IMHO it was just a part of the same speculative bubble that hiked the prices of most commodities and peaked in 2008 causing the recession. Iran already tried mining the Hormuz and USN countered it with rather successful de mining operations. Also they managed to minimize the number of tankers damaged by the Iranians using convoy tactics and oil flowed out of the Gulf whiteout any trouble. But even if Iran could close the Gulf off they know that US would immediately bomb it’s oil terminals, pipe lines and infrastructure, starving them of cash. It would be a lose/lose situation and it’s usefulness would depend on Iranian being able to keep the Hormuz closed for longer period. So I see it as the Iranian “nuclear option” and not an opening move.

          • RichardD

            A war with Iran backed by Russia and China, like Syria is, is a no win situation for the US and most Americans are well aware of it. Which is why it’s probably not going to happen. Regardless of how much the evil Jews want to see goy die.

  • Feudalism Victory

    Credit where credit is due. Syria is no longer a colonial relic but a real nation united by shared sacrifice and victory over foreign invaders. Nobody is pretending this was an internal civil war anymore with all this interest and aid to various groups from the outside. With isis being disappearing hard to say what the next move is but syria obviously has competent strategists to figure it out they certainly knew where best to focus their efforts to survive.

  • TheSecular

    After the Battle Of Damascus concludes.
    We all know the next part is the northern homs pocket.
    But after that, We will enter the next phase of the Syrian War.

    (The Political Phase)
    It will be a phase of not much fighting unless its provoked by the foreign powers.
    There will be concessions, negotiations and maybe reconciliation.

    • Barba_Papa

      Probably not that far off in your prediction. Idlib is off limits thanks to Turkey and Russia’s desire to keep Turkey on its side. Daraa on the other hand, there’s still potential for further combat there if you ask this keyboard general.

    • RichardD

      The Homs pocket is winding down. Most people didn’t expect half of Idlib to be cleared when it was, and as quickly as it was. Next may be Isis west of Dier Ezzor, which will eliminate the last interior pocket, with the Syrian government and it’s allies in complete control of the interior of the country.

      After that the border areas remain. I doubt that it’s going to be a political phase. With all of the border areas backed up by the very state actors responsible for the war in the first place. Those belligerents won’t be cut off from resupply of men and materials. And the specter of direct intervention by the governments backing them is very real, as has been happening all along.

      The Syrian government coalition has air cover and a no fly zone in place on the Israeli and Turkish borders west of the river. Which even with resupply will be very difficult for the regime change forces to hold. They’re likely to be pushed back over the borders that they came from, and are being supplied from. I doubt that there will be any significant conflict between Syria and it’s neighbors in those areas. Though I wouldn’t rule it out either. Especially with the Jews.

      The regime change force on the Jordanian border at the border crossing has US air cover at this time. Though it isn’t a very strategic area in terms of resources worth defending. The US may be more inclined to abandon that area first. The area east of the river is where the Syrian government coalition faces it’s greatest challenge. And is likely to be the area of greatest difficulty in reclaiming it by the Syrian government. Though I’m sure that plans and preparations are well advanced for doing exactly that. And unless something changes, will probably succeed.

  • RichardD

    The remaining area under Isis control is very small, and will soon be in government hands. Only about 1 mile by 2 miles. It sounds like all of the Isis members in the southern pocket that was overrun who weren’t killed were captured and can be investigated and prosecuted for their crimes by the Syrian government.

    https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4adc4942e6a693915ee421975016e49d6b47a33976b6d74e7e770d9fd9422d88.png

    – Syrian Civil War Map –

    https://syriancivilwarmap.com/