5 Strange Things About The Berlin Terror Attack

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5 Strange Things About The Berlin Terror Attack

Written by Elena Troyanova; Originally appeared at TheDuran

As the investigation and manhunt for the truck driver continue, here are five things to consider.

1) Merkel’s reaction. A horrendous terror attack on a Christmas market in Berlin on Monday evening left 12 people dead and 48 injured. Chancellor Merkel, however, only addressed the public next day, some 15 hours after the tragic event. She was ‘appalled, shocked and deeply sad about what happened at Breitscheidplatz’. Merkel admitted that she had ‘no easy answer as to how we can live with what happened’.  She also outlined that: ‘it would be particularly unbearable for all of us if it were confirmed that an asylum-seeker had committed this crime.’

It sounds as if preventing any challenges to her open-door refugee policy is of higher importance to the state than assuring safety of its citizens. At the time of such a tragedy, you would expect words of reassurance and a clear message that the government will take all possible measures to protect its people from possible acts of terror in the future. Instead, Merkel yet once again tried to justify her refugee policy, and her attempt sounded cynical toward those murdered and injured in the attack.

2) The ‘wrong’ guy. The first suspect, a Pakistani asylum-seeker Naved B., was detained by the police after an eyewitness allegedly saw him run from the truck, followed him for a couple of kilometers and informed the police. Naved was questioned till the evening of the following day, when the police concluded that there was not enough evidence to keep him in detention.

According to the German paper Tagesspiegel, Naved was previously detained under accusations of sexual assault but released by the police. Perhaps sexual attacks on women are after all not such a big deal for the German authorities.

3) One well-hidden ID. Only on Wednesday morning did the police find an ID of a 24 y.o.Tunisian asylum-seeker Anis Amri. The paper found in a wallet under the driver’s seat, Duldung, provide that Amri applied for an asylum but his application was rejected thus making Amri a subject for deportation. So why did it take the police almost 40 hours to discover that wallet?

4) A coincidence? Anis Amri spent four years in prison in Italy for burning down a school before he came to Germany in the summer 2015. According to Spiegel, Amri applied for an asylum in Kleve, Nord-Rhein-Westphalia, in April 2016. In June 2016, his asylum application was rejected as ‘unsubstantiated’. Just like another 200.000 asylum-seekers in Germany, whose asylum applications were turned down, he received a paper confirming that he is a subject for deportation but can stay in the country till the deportation takes place.

A rejected asylum-seeker can only be deported if he has a valid document (a passport or an ID), and if his country of origin co-operates with the deportation. Both were not the case with Amri. Tunisia would not admit for months that Amri is indeed a Tunisian citizen. On the other hand, Amri was registered in Germany under several different identities.

On Wednesday, two days after the terror attack, the German authorities finally received all required documents from Tunisia. At a press conference held in Düsseldorf on Wednesday, Ralf Jäger, Interior Minister of NRW, refused to comment on this, what seems to be truly amazing, timing.

5) Flaws in security. Anis Amri was under the police radar for several months as an ISIS sympathizer. It was known to the German authorities that Amri had a connection to a notorious ISIS recruiter Abu Walaa, referred to as a highest representative of ISIS in Germany. Amri sought to buy automatic weapons and tried to recruit an accomplice for a terror attack. As Süddeutsche Zeitung reports, the investigators had information that Amri planned to fight for ISIS in Syria and had trainings in preparation for his fights. And nevertheless, he was still able to remain in Germany.

Amri was associated with a group of ISIS sympathizers whose priority was to carry out terror attacks in Germany, hence his trip to Syria was delayed. One of the group’s plans was assassinations of police officers with hand grenades. Amri was identified by the German authorities as ‘highly dangerous’, detained earlier this year and yet released. For several months Amri was able to move freely across the country.

He was on the police radar in Nord-Rhein-Westphalia till February 2016, and then in Berlin from March till September of this year when his surveillance was lifted. As Amri is still at large, the danger of another terror attack remains very high. What is rather chilling about this whole tragedy is the question: how many more terrorists, of whom the police may well be aware, are there awaiting their turn to attack innocent people?

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  • paul

    For me the most ludicrous part is the finding of the ID card. How could
    this happen? Do terrorist play a sort of hide and seek game placing
    their names and addresses in a secret place for the police to find?
    I don’t keep a score of these things but if I recall correctly the
    same thing happened after the Charlie Hebdo shooting.
    This just beggers belief. Loosing an ID card at the crime scene and
    doing it more than once is just ridiculous .

    • §âm

      I know right? How do they always lose their IDs in the crime scene is beyond me

      • paul

        The odd thing is how few people seem to notice this. May be it is just my
        mind but if I was going to do something like this I would make sure
        that my body had nothing on it which could lead to identification. I
        certainly would not make a point of loosing my ID. My rational mind
        searches round for any sort of reason to explain why someone should
        do this but I fail every time.

        • Pave Way IV

          “…The odd thing is how few people seem to notice this…”

          http://esq.h-cdn.co/assets/cm/15/06/54d44c638169a_-_giphy.gif

          Why not keep doing what works? The general public is fairly stupid. Few – except a few conspiracy sites – questioned obvious planted ‘evidence’ during 9-11. If the citizens the government wants to fool have such non-existent critical thinking abilities, then why bother using some more elaborate but believable method? If I were in the German government and had a narrative I wanted to push, then why not lie to the little people and plant obviously fake evidence? Here’s what the Americans bought during 9-11:

          “…One day after 9/11 the perfectly unscathed passport of Satam Al Suqami, one of the alleged 19 hijackers, was found several blocks from Ground Zero, even though its next to impossible such a flimsy item escaped the towering inferno unblemished…”

          “…Capt. Jim Ingledue, shift safety officer of the Virginia Beach Fire Dept, said Monday he found amidst the rubble at the Pentagon, two days after 9/11, the perfectly clean and unblemished California ID card of Suzanne Calley, 42, one of the alleged victims killed aboard Flight 77…”

          From Rense.com

        • Joseph Scott

          BfV has always been this careless when faking terrorist attacks. That is pretty much what they do for a living. It’s an odd way to protect the Constitution, but it’s all they’ve ever come up with.

          • Pave Way IV

            BfV? As an American, I see the word ‘Constitution’ and immediately think your referring to the USA because we’re the only country that has one. In fact, I think we invented it! But you’re obviously referring to Germany. Is BfV German state security?

          • Joseph Scott

            Bundesamt für Verfassungsschutz: Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution. Pretty much every terrorists incident, or even crime involving ‘political extremists’ has actually been one or more of their agents operating undercover as part of whatever group they wanted to blame. German judges tend to hate them because of this, since they cause a lot of crime, but have to be let off. In a couple cases, there were multiple defendants who all turned out to be BfV agents.

            In theory, they infiltrate these groups to keep an eye on them and prevent them from doing such things, but in fact real National Socialists, Communists, Anarchists etc. in Germany tend to be rather mild-mannered, and beyond getting into street brawls, don’t really do much beyond shout slogans and engage in ideological debates, so BfV tries to incite them. However, the BfV ringleaders usually can’t convince them, so they end up having to do most of it themselves.

            In fact, it’s clear that they follow Lenin’s dictum of: “The best way to control the opposition is to lead them.” They use terrorism for state purposes, and trans-state globalist Masonic purposes.

            (As it happens, ‘Constitution’ triggers the same reaction in my mind that you describe when I write it, even though I’ve probably studied the history of German constitutions as much as the American.)

          • Pave Way IV

            Thanks, Joseph. Interesting – never heard of them or their curious methods of ‘constitutional protection’ mentioned in the U.S. MSM (I wonder why). They must share notes on their schemes with the FBI, although the FBI appears to be laying low as of late. The FBI has it easy though. An FBI agent is not likely to get hauled before a federal judge for inciting terror because they both work for the same boss.

      • trid2bnrml

        Perhaps they’re covering for the CIA Operative who really did it.

        • §âm

          Yeah more i think of about it i think it’s best explaination

  • Elisabeth Jenders

    Yes, and the death of the suspect in the end … just to fool the public that “we know who did it, he’s not dangerous any more, we have everything under control, you are safe”.
    Same story always, lack of imagination to invent a different one.

    Angela Merkel, give us a Chistmas gift: Resign!

  • White-Gandalf

    It’s completely irrelevant which policy towards war victims you adopt, as long as you keep feeding world wide well known terrorists, on which at least a bunch of state level executives have all eyes on, have full knowledge of their intends, even have knowledge of their terror acts for at least months, eventually up to years in advance.

    This terrorist was in no way an unwritten letter. His action was planned WITH the knowledge and assistence of u-boots from the german secret service.

    The is no way to change anything on this matter as long as the controlling figures in the secret service and their political advisers in the government remain in their power. THOSE should be executed in first place, before taking on the bloody dumb idiots that fulfill the dirty tasks.

  • Daniel Martin

    The hardest enemy to fight is the fifth column that you have in your own house …

  • §âm

    All terrorists lose their IDs or passport at the crime scene!!! How???? Or Why?
    If he was a criminal he should have been deported… they shouldn’t tolerate criminal refugees! Make example out of them!!

  • Bobby

    In all these alleged terrorist events we’re supposed to believe the the terrorist brought a photo ID with him and “accidentally” left it at the crime scene. This is the same story over and over again at almost every “Terrorist event”. You really have to be completely brain dead to believe this nonsense. Either the event is fake or the explanation is fake.

    • trid2bnrml

      the explanation is fake

  • Bob

    Not too get too conspiratorial, but who benefits from these terrorist events in EU? The official explanations, and the key suspect’s past involvements with security services are always kind of murky – they were either known radical sympathizers and released, or they were under surveillance and still managed the crime? As for this habit of the suspect’s ID turning up a day later at the scene…again?!!